Post Bop

Jazz music community with reviews, MP3 (free download/stream) and forums

Part I

Post Bop is a modern jazz style that continues the distinguishing characteristics that separate jazz from the world of pop and rock; swing rhythm and extended harmonies (9th chords 11ths, altered chords, etc). Post Bop grew out of the Hard Bop genre during the early to mid 60s as musicians such as Bill Evans, Wayne Shorter, and Herbie Hancock began to introduce more extended harmonies, abstract structures and looser rhythms in their playing and compositions. When Hancock and Shorter joined Miles Davis’ quintet in the mid-60s, that group became the perfect vehicle for extending the boundaries of what could happen in a Post Bop format. The Miles Davis Quintet albums, "Nefertiti" and "Sorcer", continue to be pinnacles of Post Bop composition and performance. Some styles of free modal jazz, such as Coltrane's "A Love Supreme", are also part of the Post Bop sound. Although there are still some musicians, such as Kenny Garret, who play in that style, mostly that sound has been fading since the early 70s.

While still in its infancy, Post Bop was pushed off the radar during the 70s as many of its early proponents pursued the far more lucrative fields of fusion and smooth jazz. As the fusion fad began to fade, musicians began to tire of three chord vamps and the limitations of rock/pop rhythms and yearned to work with sophisticated chord changes and jazz rhythms again. The stage was set in the early 80s for the “young lion” movement and a return to both Post Bop and Hard Bop for a lot of young musicians and their fan base.

Today’s Post Bop covers a wide variety, from radio friendly to borderline avant-garde, and it’s a genre that is still ripe for more exploration. Generally speaking, the difference between Post Bop and Hard Bop is that Hard Bop carries a stronger trace of the blues and a more straight forward driving rhythm, but when you are trying to analyze certain artists or pieces of music, that difference is not always clear. Much of Branford Marsalis's music is a good example of jazz that sits right between post and hard bop. With some music, arguing whether it is Post Bop or Hard Bop becomes pointless, since depending on perspective, either genre can be seen as a subset of the other. Although we use the genre term Post Bop to tag the music described above, in a more generic sense, post bop can be the name of any swing based jazz music created after the passing of the be-bop era.

Part 2 - Post Bop in the New Century

As jazz continues to grow and develop, the worlds of modern fusion and post bop have grown closer together as many musicians; such as Dave Douglas, Craig Taborn, Greg Osby and others, freely mix elements into new hybrids.

At JMA, the distinction between Fusion and Post Bop continues to be that distinctive African syncopation known as "swing". Generally Post Bop should swing, while Fusion, quite often does not. What has changed, as we move further into the 21st century, is the way in which modern drummers are 'swinging'. Inventive drummers such as Jeff "Tain" Watts, Rudy Roystan and others are no longer putting the swing beat solely on the ride cymbal. Instead, they are liable to use any, or all pieces of the drum set at once, while they swing the beat. Also, the swing feel itself is often a bit disguised in modern jazz, it may not be so obvious, and the drummer may move in and out of swing feel, sometimes even within one phrase.

post bop top albums

Showing only albums and live's | Based on members ratings & JMA custom algorithm | 60 min. caching

JOHN COLTRANE A Love Supreme Album Cover A Love Supreme
JOHN COLTRANE
4.86 | 77 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
MCCOY TYNER Sahara Album Cover Sahara
MCCOY TYNER
4.96 | 14 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
CHARLES MINGUS The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady Album Cover The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady
CHARLES MINGUS
4.84 | 56 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
MILES DAVIS Miles Davis Quintet : Miles Smiles Album Cover Miles Davis Quintet : Miles Smiles
MILES DAVIS
4.80 | 34 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
YUSEF LATEEF Eastern Sounds Album Cover Eastern Sounds
YUSEF LATEEF
4.86 | 11 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
DAVE HOLLAND Dave Holland Quintet ‎: Extended Play - Live at Birdland Album Cover Dave Holland Quintet ‎: Extended Play - Live at Birdland
DAVE HOLLAND
4.84 | 9 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
HERBIE HANCOCK Speak Like a Child Album Cover Speak Like a Child
HERBIE HANCOCK
4.76 | 15 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
KEITH JARRETT Whisper Not (Live in Paris 1999) (with Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette) Album Cover Whisper Not (Live in Paris 1999) (with Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette)
KEITH JARRETT
4.87 | 7 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
MCCOY TYNER Song for My Lady Album Cover Song for My Lady
MCCOY TYNER
4.95 | 5 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
MILES DAVIS E.S.P. Album Cover E.S.P.
MILES DAVIS
4.73 | 16 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
KEITH JARRETT Inside Out (with Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette) Album Cover Inside Out (with Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette)
KEITH JARRETT
4.80 | 9 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
DAVE HOLLAND Dave Holland Quintet ‎: Not For Nothin' Album Cover Dave Holland Quintet ‎: Not For Nothin'
DAVE HOLLAND
4.81 | 7 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
This list is in progress since the site is new. We invite all logged in members to use the "quick rating" widget (stars bellow album covers) or post full reviews to increase the weight of your rating in the global average value (see FAQ for more details). Enjoy JMA!

New post bop free MP3/Stream

post bop online videos

post bop New Releases

.. Album Cover
Meditations On Freedom
Album
NOAH PREMINGER
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Stephen Riley & Peter Zak : Deuce
Album
STEPHEN RILEY
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Post Cool Vol.1
Album
CAROL MORGAN
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Almost There
Album
BARRY GREEN
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Hear & Now
Album
NICK FINZER
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Central Line
Album
ART HIRAHARA
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Sanguinaria-Hopefulsongs
Album
BRAD MYERS
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Make Noise!
Album
JEREMY PELT
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Kindred Spirits
Album
PAUL YONEMURA
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Tales & Tones
Album
TROY ROBERTS
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Color Tones
Album
JOHN STEIN
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Infinite Distances
Album
NOAH HAIDU
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Hush Point III
Album
HUSH POINT
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Potsdamer Platz
Album
JAN LUNDGREN
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Up And Coming
Album
JOHN ABERCROMBIE
Buy this album from MMA partners

post bop Music Reviews

TROY ROBERTS Tales & Tones

Album · 2017 · Post Bop
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Carmel
Saxophonist Troy Roberts lives up to his reputation as one of the leading young saxophonists on the scene today. A regular member of The Jeff “Tain” Watts Quartet, The Jeff “Tain” Watts Blue 5, and the newest member of Joey DeFrancesco’s new quartet, The People. Roberts’ seventh record as a leader, Tales & Tones (Inner Circle Music) is smokin'.

Nine songs adorn this new offering, and the ensemble sports a who’s, who of today’s jazz greats including Silvano Monasterios on piano, Jeff “Tain” Watts on drums together with longtime friend on bass, Robert Hurst. The instinctive dynamism from this ensemble is profound as Troy Roberts puts his pen to the paper and challenges his fellow musicians with creative, and well-conceived ideas. In their hands these musicians put forth depth and clarity of steadfast moods and tonal colors. The tempo of each song is varied, from swingin hardness to soft playful introspection. Offering the listener deliberate, yet vivid rhythmic journey’s through Roberts visionary ideas. Tales & Tones focuses on the chronicle aspect of Roberts’ playing while it also highlights his ability with reed instruments.

The soundscape traverses, an almost patchwork of the most beautiful quilt you have ever seen. Stitched together with plaintive reflective pieces such as “Rivera Mountain” where Watts shows his mastery to create time, space and texture while Hurst creates the connection of sound and movement with his supportive, warm sound. Roberts reacts to the nuances and push and pull created by Watts and Hurst. Pianist Monasterios, presents a laid back buoyant touch that deepens the beauty of Roberts soprano solo. The ensemble is supportive of the overall group sound, each understanding the partnership of the journey. I was especially taken with Billy Strayhorn’s “Take The ‘A’ Train,” the ensemble kicks off with an almost train sound calling the listener aboard, with creative embellishments to the melody; the group truly makes this their own unique take. Filled with swinging tempo changes, it’s a narrative to how well-worn standards such as this can still be given a freshened life while still showing respect. “Cotu Chi, Chi, Chi,” a Roberts original displays mature finesse, giving the ensemble an opportunity to open up the throttle and exhibit the restrained gravitas of seasoned players that makes jazz a prime listen. In the hands of this ensemble the high paced, high flying tune is bold and Roberts sound is big, brazen and focused. With no hesitation, he expresses and builds his solo with glowing dynamism.

A group of players each in their own careers, known to be robust players – now coming together, offer a deeper grasp of sound. They interlock so tightly, yet so respectfully you, instantly recognize the comradery and care of the journey together, which creates a depth and breadth of the experience. Well done, highly recommended listen.

MARCELLO PELLITTERI Aquarius Woman

Album · 2016 · Post Bop
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
js
Marcello Pellitteri may not be a household name, but he has played drums with just about every major jazz star you can think of, as well as many pop stars and studio orchestras as well. On his new album, “Aquarius Woman”, Marcello displays his versatility by presenting an album that covers more styles than most people cover in their career. “Aquarius Woman” opens with a couple of grooving hard bop numbers that seem to establish a style for the rest of the album, but instead Marcello follows these openers with a couple of pastoral post bop ballads, and then moves on to RnB ballads, funky hip-hop jazz and some spoken word pieces as well. Pellitteri has a great support group on hand led by the intense alto playing of Orazio Maugeri. Orazio has a bright sound that recalls Jackie McLean, and a dexterity that recalls McLean’s idol, Charlie Parker. Maugeri can not only bop and weave, but his ability to rock out on the funky tunes recalls modern artists like Joshua Redman, or Branford Marsalis’ early funk projects. A long with the core group, various guests show up, including tenor sax man George Garzone, who burns brightly on the opening track.

All of the tracks on here are good, with highlights being the aforementioned swinging opening tracks, and the funky hip-hop/indie rock grooves of “Twenty Three” and “Colors on Your Face”. Some well known cover tunes are given interesting face lifts such as Alicia Keys’ “If I aint got You” which is given some flatted notes in the melody by guest vocalist Nedelka Prescod, and a reversal of the vocal phrasing in a call and response with the saxophone. Much of this album is dedicated to Pellitteri’s daughter, Veronica, who died at a very young 23 years of age. All profits from the sell of this CD will go to the Veronica Pellitteri Memorial Fund, administered by Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts.

MILES DAVIS Miles Davis Quintet : Miles Smiles

Album · 1966 · Post Bop
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
frankbernardi22
Miles smiles and he's not pretending a part. He's really happy for his new family of musicians, so happy that he himself really can't believe this miracle of combo exists on earth and he's the creator of such a beauty. He needed his Golden Quintet, the highest expression of all times (neo) classic jazz, something living its (smiling) summer but with all the dangerous nostalgia of a perfectly mature fruit. So much that perfection that it was like a bridge to the unknown. Pure angst, at the end. Two were the alternatives to follow: the taste of decadence or a cut with the past. This gifted combo, touched by the hand of history, is sqeezed by Miles like a lemon; after, throught the naked "In a silent way", Miles and friends (those with him in that moment, because that was his - and their - own cruel and marvellous fate) will find themselves on the rich but deserted shores of "Bitches Brew", the occasion for many in the world to listen to Davis for the first time. But connoisseurs all around knew very well this perfect microgroove where everybody was smiling, according to Anthony Tuttle liner notes: "The entire quintet plays as if there were a shared smile between them, each man lending his efforts to the whole while the whole reflects the solid contribution of each man". A perfect definition good for every album of Miles magic quintet, starting from "ESP", first studio brick in a solid house. A castle. The building of dreams. "Seven steps..." is still tradition with some changes added but not a convinced piece of the new direction. Miles was waiting for Wayne, the Coltrane he always wanted. And from that lp to "ESP" we have only live albums. We have to wait until 1965, year of "ESP", to taste new flavours: but soon, 1966, everybody smiles with the leader. "Miles smiles" and we believe his smiling to be true. He's even surprised that his meditations or even impulses can find easy incarnation in music. He's really the genius he thinks to be. Everything's so smooth, in those years, that seems incredible, to him, to us, the amount of work, sometimes obscure, difficult work, waiting for Miles just around the corner. Smiling Miles soon will be a very far souvenir if compared to the ground zero of "In a silent way" or the path to hell of "Bitches brew": both streets with no return.

COREY KENDRICK Rootless

Album · 2016 · Post Bop
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Carmel
The Corey Kendrick Trio combines the infectious swing of yesteryear with the precision of today’s modern jazz harmonic sensibilities. The trio came together while studying under Rodney Whitaker at Michigan State University, it is here the Corey Kendrick Trio developed their unique, straight ahead sound, cultivated by two and a half years of extensive performing.

Their debut recording, Rootless highlights a theme of life and its many emotions, tracks like “The Unknown/The Unexpected” speak to the emotion of starting anew, a sleek and grooved based feel, coupled with the well-chosen colorizations of Kendrick on piano add credence to drummer Nick Bracewell’s texturized accents, and bassist Joe Vasquez, rooted groove lines. While cuts like “Alone in Michigan” speak to the loneliness of being away from home and the emptiness of missing loved ones. The trio creates an introspective take on this Kendrick original that is pensive and emotive. A celebratory fast paced tune is found in “Blues al Pastor” giving way to a burner for the trio, with quick crashes and nimble paced notes a flurry, the trio shines on this cut, showing the prowess of all involved in this tightly knit trio. Closing out the disc is a lilting tune capturing the indescribable emotions of new parenthood “Lullaby For A New Mother” offers the listener a beautiful journey with a fluidity of soundscape and the delicacy of joy, with passionate moments of fervor.

Rootless traverses a large terrain of emotions, but keeps firmly rooted in the jazz straight ahead idiom. A highly recommended listen, especially for the piano trio aficionado.

CHARLES MINGUS The Great Concert of Charles Mingus

Live album · 1971 · Post Bop
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
js
This review is written using the original 3 LP set in a huge foldout gate sleeve cover. If you had to pick the number one top recorded jazz performance known to mankind, you would have a hard time finding one that topped “The Great Concert of Charles Mingus”, a live set that was recorded in Paris in 1964, but not released until the early 70s. It doesn’t hurt that two of the greatest performers of all-time, Mingus and Eric Dolphy, have possibly the best performances of their careers on here, but also the brilliant supporting cast of Jaki Byard, Dannie Richmond and Clifford Jordan are likewise inspired for possible career topping performances as well. Johnny Coles was supposed to be on trumpet, but sickness knocked him off of every performance except the very first cut. This opening cut, by the way, is mis-labeled as “Goodbye Pork Pie Hat”, when it actually is “So Long Eric”, a better choice for an opening tune anyway.

The concert opens with a nice bluesy groove for the first couple solos, but when Dolphy steps up for his solo, all hell breaks loose and things continue to unravel from there in a rainbow kalediscope of colliding musical ideas. Remaining tracks like “Parkeriana” , “Meditations on Integration” and “Fables of Faubus” feature bizarre complex arrangements that show that both Mingus and Dolphy were very capable modern concert hall composers. When the band is cut loose from the arrangements, they burn with an unprecedented intensity. So much of the music on here pre-dates what is happening in jazz in the early 21st century, such as tonality blended with atonality and compositional structure blended with free blowing. Add to that, something unique to this session, intellectualism blended with emotional fire.

Eric Dolphy is often incorrectly grouped with early 60s “free” players such as Albert Alyer and Archie Shepp. While Dolphy did play free jazz on occasion, and was quite adept at it, this recording is a good example of how Dolphy’s true calling was working with melody and chord changes. Eric’s attempts to take these things to extremes made him more an extension of the Charlie Parker school of music, which is reflected in the mash-up of Parker melodies presented during “Parkeriana”.

If there is one problem with this recording, it would be in Jaki Byard’s volume level, he just sounds a little distant compared to the others, which is a shame because he is a brilliant and under-rated pianist. Byard never really got with the modern minimal sound of Bud Powell and Monk, instead he played more in the old school huge stride based sound of Earl Hines and Art Tatum, which Byard would modernize with atonal clusters of notes and noisy clatter which blended great with the Mingus-Dolphy approach. There is always a lot of mischievous humor to what Jaki serves up as well.

If you ever wonder why jazz fans make a big deal out of Charles Mingus, this record should help you understand why

post bop movie reviews

No post bop movie reviews posted yet.

Artists with Post Bop release(s)

JMA TOP 5 Jazz ALBUMS

Rating by members, ranked by custom algorithm
Albums with 30 ratings and more
Kind of Blue Cool Jazz
MILES DAVIS
Buy this album from our partners
A Love Supreme Post Bop
JOHN COLTRANE
Buy this album from our partners
The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady Post Bop
CHARLES MINGUS
Buy this album from our partners
Miles Davis Quintet : Miles Smiles Post Bop
MILES DAVIS
Buy this album from our partners

New Jazz Artists

New Jazz Releases

Downtown Funk '74 Funk
SPEEDOMETER
Buy this album from MMA partners
Stefano Battaglia Theatrum: Book Of Songs Vol. 1 Post-Fusion Contemporary
STEFANO BATTAGLIA
Buy this album from MMA partners
I remember Art Hard Bop
HARRY SOKAL
Buy this album from MMA partners
Recent Developments 21st Century Modern
HARRIS EISENSTADT
Buy this album from MMA partners
More new releases

New Free Jazz MP3 download/stream

New Jazz Online Videos

More videos

New JMA Jazz Forum Topics

More in the forums

New Site interactions

More...

Latest Jazz News

members-submitted

More in the forums

Social Media

Share this site
Follow us