Classic (1920s) Jazz

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Classic Jazz refers more to a transitional era (1920s), rather than any specific style. During the 1920s jazz slowly shifted from the exuberant New Orleans and Dixieland styles toward a more sophisticated and urbane swing style. Many artists who participated in this transition had careers that overlapped into Dixieland in the early 20s, and into swing in the middle 30s. Not only was the music shifting during this time, but the performing ensembles were growing bigger as more dance orchestras began to use jazz elements creating a big band jazz/pop hybrid that would lead to the classic big bands of the swing era.

The leaders of classic 1920s jazz are orchestra leader Fletcher Henderson and his star soloist, Louis Armstrong. The Henderson orchestra did away with the constant polyphonic soloing of New Orleans jazz and replaced it with cool relaxed riffing which provided a background for Armstrong's expressive melodies and exciting solos. Classic jazz is still played by jazz lovers all over the world, although not always with the right feel.

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LOUIS ARMSTRONG Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy Album Cover Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy
LOUIS ARMSTRONG
4.95 | 3 ratings
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LOUIS ARMSTRONG Satch Plays Fats: A Tribute to the Immortal Fats Waller Album Cover Satch Plays Fats: A Tribute to the Immortal Fats Waller
LOUIS ARMSTRONG
4.95 | 2 ratings
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LOUIS ARMSTRONG Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five Volume 1 Album Cover Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five Volume 1
LOUIS ARMSTRONG
4.95 | 2 ratings
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LOUIS ARMSTRONG Hello, Dolly Album Cover Hello, Dolly
LOUIS ARMSTRONG
5.00 | 1 ratings
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LOUIS ARMSTRONG The Great Chicago Concert

Live album · 1957 · Classic (1920s) Jazz
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Matt
They nearly threw the lot out at Columbia records in 1980, someone had decided to get rid of some old tapes and "The Great Chicago Concert" was on a desk ready to go when Michael Brooks who was producing reissues strolled by and enquired what they were. George Aviakan was the original producer behind the live recording of the concert but at the time decided to shelve it due to techinical issues with the recording as well as there being a lenghty narration by Helen Hayes at the begining concerning Jazz with Louis included. Louis had practically stepped of the plane and here he was with The All Stars straight into this concert. Things are a little out of order due to issues that arose during the event with sound quality problems with some of the material and also there really was not much new material which George Aviakan was hoping for so he decided to shelve the tapes. George was expecting a few more new numbers as Louis Armstrong was not renowned for changing his song list often in concert and usually had the same fifty tunes or so that he and the All Stars performed. Always opened with "When It Is Sleepy Time Down South" and usually wound it up with "When the Saints Go Marchin' In". There is a bit of mix with "When It Is Sleepy Time" coming in at a later spot and only briefly but still we have some great stuff. The All Stars at this time are Edmund Hall, clarinet, Trummy Young, blasting trombone and vocals on two songs, Billy Kyle, piano, Dale Jones, bass, Barrett Deems on drums and Velma Middleton does her thing with Louis doing vocals on three numbers. How many concerts Louis performed would be anybody's guess but he always gave it his best shot and although things do not gel technically they still do with the music as the poorer quality material was dropped with the narration by Helen Hayes and still we have two discs of material with 26 numbers included with four of them being medleys and it is all Live.

Two medleys in a row is what gets the first cd underway with the first being a New Orleans funeral march "Flee As A Bird To The Mountain" and "Oh Didn't He Ramble" which was the only section of the concert ever released until 1980. The second medley has "Memphis Blues", "Frankie And Johnny" and "Tiger Rag" with no vocals but plenty of that gorgeous New Orleans tradition is applied and if one listens close you can hear some of the techinical issues with the recording volume as a wagon was used on stage making it difficult to mic' up to say the least but it does not cause any problems as the small fault is at the begining. What are the best songs that are performed for the next eleven on this first disc, one would be hard pressed to decide with so many classics. "Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans", Fats Waller's absolute classic "Black and Blue which is one of my standouts but that was preceded by "Basin Street Blues" and followed by King Oliver's composition "West End Blues" which Louis transformed back in 1928 to become one of the greatest Jazz tunes ever played."On The Sunny Side Of The Street" needs no introduction, "Struttin' With Some Barbecue" another of Louis's classics from the twenties followed by three superb takes of "Indiana", "The Gypsy" and a great take on "The Faithful Hussar" which Louis made his own from an old German song that he performed at practically every concert.

Disc 2 has another German number as well which was a hit for Louis being "Mack The Knife" but the disc opens with "Rockin' Chair "with Trummy Young doing vocals as he does later on "Margie" but I love the old standard that follows "Bucket's Got A Hole In It" which was the original way to pick up ones beer. "Perdido", "Clarinet Marmalade" is giving the band a go with "Mack The Knife" after but we have another medley that follows with "Tenderley" bridged with Billy Kyle's piano solo followed by the classic Rodgers and Hammerstein composition "You'll Never Walk Alone" and Louis wrings it right out with his beautiful interruptation of these two ballads playing them entirely instrumental and even someone yells a comment that Billy plays so sexy during his piano solo. Louis does take a bit of back seat with the second disc as Thelma Middleton gets do the majority of vocals for three numbers with Louis introducing Thelma with the quote "and now it is blues time" with "Big Mama's Back In Town" coming first with plenty of swing included. The ballad "That's My Desire" is given the Thelma treatment as the following "Ko Ko Mo (I Love You So)" with that swing back and Louis joining in for this one on a duet. Do you know I still have not mentioned another famous classic form the swing period that Louis used to include being Louis and Chick Webb's "Jumpin' At The Savoy". At closing time he always played "When The Saints Go Marchin In" which I have known all my life and cannot even remember when I first heard the tune it is like you are born with it already there but no matter how many times one hears this, it is always enjoyable and an instant singalong and who better to do it with his beautiful trumpet than the great Louis Armstrong. The concert finishes with Louis playing "The Star Spangled Banner"

There are small sound faults at times but they are only on three numbers and not that noticable as they are at the start of the songs with "Sleepy Time Down South" being the major issue and when the volume picks up, just think it is the band moving a little closer to the audience. Wonderful material, wonderful concert, wonderful album but most of all what is really wonderful is the sound of Louis Armstrong's trumpet and there is no shortage of that for "The Great Chicago Concert".

LOUIS ARMSTRONG Satch Plays Fats: A Tribute to the Immortal Fats Waller

Album · 1955 · Classic (1920s) Jazz
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Matt
Recorded in 1955 a year after his masterpiece "Louis Armstrong and His All-Stars Plays W.C.Handy","Satch Plays Fats" is another classic New Orleans flavoured album. Sure "Fats Waller" did not hail from there but came from "New York but "Pops" definately did and that was the way he played with that original form of Jazz that emanated from his trumpet in the 1920's. The "All-Stars" are exactly the same as for the W.C Handy album with "Thelma Middleton" providing vocals again and although sometimes criticised for her range she most likely did what Louis Armstrong always wanted and that is to accompany him and not make things unbalanced and I myself absolutely love to hear Louis sing but you would have to agree he was not "Frank Sinatra". "Trummy Young" is blasting on trombone with his usual approach and poor "Barney Bigard" on clarinet is still trying to be heard by blowing as hard as he can to keep up."Billy Kyle" is on piano,"Arvell Shaw", bass and "Barrett Deems" is on drums. Fats was a stride pianist who often used humour in his lyrics but he still passed along the message of being black in the first half of the ninetenth century with his composition "Black and Blue" and his songs that he composed in the 1920's and 30's are still played today and are considered Jazz Standards as "Fats Waller's" place in Jazz history is considered to be a cornerstone for the genre. His tunes were part of Louis Armstrong's standard repertoire with "Ain't Misbehavin" and "Keepin' Out of Mischief" being two of his regulars and as usual he breathes new life into them with a traditional approach that only he could do with only the best trumpet playing in Jazz.

"Honeysuckle Rose" begins the album and the whole band has a quick shot with a solo and Thelma with Billy on piano lead us in ,with Louis coming in on vocals and Barney's clarinet just underneath with some superb quick solos from everybody with Louis going first. "Blue Turning Grey Over You" is down tempo and New Orleans as it can get with Louis opening with some wonderful trumpet and singing this one without Thelma. "I'm Crazy 'Bout My Baby and My Baby's Crazy 'Bout Me" with "Squeeze Me" follow with both being superb." Keepin' Out of Mischief' Is one of the highlights with a wonderful rendition by the band and who else could sing it better, than Louis, even Frank Sinatra could not have had the feel that Louis had for this song. "All That Meat and No Potatoes" is often pointed out as low point and it does not really seem to gel with the vocals between Thelma and Louis but does it matter when Trummy and Barney play two great solos respectively. The last two tracks are more high points with the first being a wonderful version of "( What did I do to be so) Black and Blue" with the closer being a stunning take of "Aint Misbehavin" and given beautiful spirited feel with some of that top note Louis Armstrong trumpet. Trummy's trombone with Barney's clarinet are superb but Louis just blows them all away with his solo that just keeps getting higher.

"Satch Plays Fats" is just as essential as "W.C Handy" in your jazz collection with both being New Orleans traditional masterpieces from the greatest musician ever that played trumpet and one who's own exuberance always showed through with his joyful approach to life as well as his music. Both these albums are my favourite "Louis Armstrong " albums and both are pure Jazz with that original New Orleans influence.This review was only taken from the original issue of the cd which was released way back in the late 1980's and all those extra bonus tracks were not issued on this edition.

LOUIS ARMSTRONG Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy

Album · 1954 · Classic (1920s) Jazz
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Matt
"T'aint what you do, it's the way you do it" and Louis Armstrong could do any of it. The father of Jazz with his All Star Band providing support decides to play the father of blues W.C. Handy ( William Christopher ) and the results were spectacular. When W.C.Handy heard the album he cried with delight and thanked Loius to which he replied, "Aint no work making records like this! Them old time good ones play themselves Mr Handy". Louis is on trumpet of course and vocals, Velma Middleton had been doing vocals with him for thirteen years at the time of this recording, Trummy Young is on trombone and played in the All Stars for eleven years, Barney Bigard is playing clarinet and this New Orleans local had been spending his time with Duke Ellington previously, Billy Kyle is doing piano with Arvell Shaw on bass and Barret Deems on drums. Traditional Jazz with the exhuberence and talent of Louis Armstrong and who else could have made these blues tunes like this with its Southern influence and even though W.C. Handy comes from Tennesee,( born in Alabama) this is pure New Orleans.

Naturally Louis starts with "St Louis Blues" with his trumpet opening the song with clarity and perfect pitch, Trummy is providing support on trombone. Barney Bigard stated in his autobiography that he could barely keep up with either but the harder he played both of them just went up another notch. Trummy Young on trombone made the same comment concerning just Louis. Velma Middleton also contributes with vocals which was always in a duet fashion with Louis and always a cheeky comment with humour injected into the songs. Everbody gets a solo with all three doing beautiful jobs but the ones from Louis and Trummy are spectacular and in their interplay one feels both are trying to get louder than the other. One blazing opening first song is followed by the more down tempo "Yellow Dog Blues with Louis doing vocals on his own and a great solo with all three interjecting and playing with each other and that trumpet by Louis just soars over it. " Loveless Love" originally taken fron the song "Careless Love" was adapted by W.C. Handy. Velma Middleton is back and she leads with the first vocal in this timeless tune. The music once again is exemplary with the band, Louis's trumpet, Barney's clarinet and Trummy blazing away on trombone trying to keep up. "Aunt Hagar's Blues follows along and then we come to "Long Gone" ( From Bowlin' Green) with its loud intro and Velma and Louis doing vocals together and always a quick or playful interjection between the other. Trummy Young comes in blazing when his chance arrives but Louis takes it higher and one great little romper of a tune with humour and just a little spice is the result. "The Memphis Blues"( Mister Crump) follows which W.C. Handy's first wrote in 1909 for Edward Crump's mayoral campaign. Louis does this one on his own without Velma. 'Ole Miss is the only instrumental on the album and this is where Louis solos on his own with just the rythmn section all the other solos on the album are with the others as well. Three other beautifuuly played blues songs to still follow being "Chantez-Les Bas ( Sing 'Em Low ), "Hesitating Blues" and "Atlanta Blues" ( Make Me a Pallet on the Floor) and all are perfect.

Louis Armstrong is perhaps the greatest muscian ever put on this earth and his legacy not only to Jazz but to Popular music was immense. One of his finest albums which should be in any decent Jazz collection.

LOUIS ARMSTRONG Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five Volume 1

Album · 1925 · Classic (1920s) Jazz
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js
Not only is this some of the finest classic jazz you can find on vinyl, but this record is a great snapshot of how jazz was developing in the 1920s. As jazz was progressing from the early New Orleans style of constant ensemble based polyphonic improvisation and towards a swing style that would feature star soloists on top of an ensemble that supplied supporting pre-arranged riffs, Louis Armstrong was leading the way. The first side of this album was recorded in 1925, and the second in 1927, and what a difference just two years would make in this time of rapid development in jazz.

Side one is a step towards swing; the soloists, such as Armstrong and clarenetist Johnny Dodd, are upfront and center and displaying the new virtuoso solo style of the time, but the ensemble stills has the sound and persistent rhythms of early jazz. On side two the transformation towards swing continues as the rhythms relax and ‘swing’ more. The overall sound is more urban and sophisticated and the soloists are mixed even more up front as their ability to solo increases.

Anyway, enough about musicology, this is also one hell of a fun party record old school style. The joy and enthusiasm in Louis and his band’s playing is contagious and never fails to lighten your mood. This is also the record where Armstrong introduced his beloved humorous scat singing on the big hit ‘Heebie Jeebies’, with nonsense syllables like skat, dat, de and so on. This record is highly recommended for people who like real jazz.

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