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jazz music reviews (new releases)

CHRIS POTTER Imaginary Cities

Album · 2015 · 21st Century Modern
Cover art 4.00 | 1 rating
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Amilisom
This album was my personal introduction to Chris Potter's Underground Orchestra. Being the first one on the ECM label, this album also features a string quartet in addition to the lineup.

The use of the string quartet adds a nice color and variety to the album. On tracks such as "Dualities" and "Shadow Self" the string quartet is used in a way that even has classical implications - one might not be wrong in calling this third-stream at points. Fortunately the string quartet is neither overused or underused, but disappears and reappears throughout the album with perfect balance.

With an ensemble of this type, each track was written with creative form. Rather than follow the typical pattern of playing the head, going into a solo section, and going back to the head to close, most of the tracks on this album have complicated forms that feature instrumentals with the string quartet between solos. "Disintigration" even starts as an open, rubato free jazz track before everybody joins in on a unison melody. "Shadow Self" starts as a literal classical string quartet in the style of Dmitri Shostakovich before Potter comes in with a short bass clarinet solo.

My personal favorite of the album is Lament. Chris Potter plays one of the most memorable solos I have ever heard him play and it builds perfectly from start to finish.

One disappointment I had with this album was that it only features the piano player, Craig Taborn, on one track. His solo on "Sky" is pretty good, but I was hoping for more.

DARIA Strawberry Fields Forever - Songs By The Beatles

Album · 2016 · Vocal Jazz
Cover art 3.50 | 1 rating
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js
A jazz tribute to the Beatles is not unusual, there are many out there, but what is more selective is a tribute that tries to re-shape the Beatles’ original music, and does so successfully, and that is what we have in Daria’s creative re-structuring of the ‘fab four’ on her new album, “Strawbwrry Fields Forever (Songs by the Beatles)”. Daria and her crew of San Francisco jazz artists take on several Lennon-McCartney classics, and do so fearlessly as they dare to re-harmonize some of pop culture’s most treasured melodies. It’s a bold move, but it pays off as this CD is much more interesting than yet another more faithful ’by-the-numbers’ rendition. You’ll easily recognize every tune on here, but as the songs unfold, you will be intrigued by changes in harmony, melodic line, and rhythm. It’s the changes in rhythm on ‘Strawberry’ that may be the album’s most striking feature, as the Beatles’ original pop/rock beats are replaced with syncopated rhythms from Brazil, Cuba, Jamaica and New Orleans.

An interesting thing happens when you transform the music to a well known Beatles song, once the background becomes less familiar, the lyrics come shining through in a new way and you are reminded that these guys not only wrote good tunes, but they were often very capable modern poets as well. You may not think “Come Together” can work as a samba, but the new rhythms isolate Lennon’s flow of consciousness nonsense lyrics and takes them to new heights (of silliness?). Some other highlights include a horn driven New Orleans funk version of “Helter Skelter”, and a nu-jazzy psychedelic version of title track “Strawberry Fields”.

Production and arrangement on “Strawberry Fields Forever” is excellent and they keep things interesting by varying the ensembles from piano quartet, to Steely Dan styled mini-big band, Afro-Cuban ensemble or other variations. Many guest musicians offer a variety of horns, guitars, keyboards and percussion. Daria is an excellent singer and her treatment of these well known classics is thoughtful and delivered with insight

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jazz music reviews (older releases)

MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA Inner Worlds

Album · 1976 · Classic Fusion
Cover art 1.95 | 12 ratings
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Miler72
OK, so I'm laughing over this cover. I knew I had to get this album for the cover. What was John McLaughlin thinking to pose shirtless on this cover? Grand Funk Railroad, maybe? McLaughlin hardly seems the kind of guy who'd take something like Grand Funk seriously, but he's certainly taking after Mark Farner's tendency of going shirtless (at least Farner had an excuse, it's rock and roll, for one thing, and the girls started screaming when he took off his shirt at Grand Funk concerts, which I'm sure if McLaughlin tried the same thing at Mahavishnu concerts, he won't get the same reaction, probably laughed at, but then I'm sure he only went shirtless for this album cover).

Inner Worlds is the last album (until a 1980s reunion) of Mahavishnu Orchestra. At this point, Gayle Moran had departed, to join her husband Chick Corea in Return to Forever for their apparently forgettable Magicmusic. Jean-Luc Ponty also departed, to continue embarking on his hugely successful solo career. In comes Stu Goldberg on keyboards, no violin this time, with Narada Michael Walden and Ralphe Armstrong remaining. Visions of the Emerald Beyond is easily the best album they did outside the original lineup. Vocals, while present, were kept to a minimum, allowed for more great instrumental workouts for the band. Now comes Inner Worlds. Is it really that bad? The instrumental stuff, which there still is plenty is actually quite good, but what throws people off are the vocals cuts. I actually like a couple of them, "Planetary Citizen" has a funky vibe going on. I think people are simply thrown off by the vocal cuts (most of them sung by Michael Waldon, one sung by Ralphe Armstrong) and the soul/R&B influence seems to collide with the instrumental fusion found on the album. If they stuck to what they did on the previous album, only a couple of vocal songs, and the rest was instrumental, they'd probably not get the negative reactions they did here. Strangely I don't find this album that bad, even the vocal cuts, as out of place as they are, are, for the most part, pretty enjoyable to me. I doubt this review will make you change you mind on Inner Worlds, so this is pretty much my opinion.

FLETCHER HENDERSON Quadromania: Wrappin' It Up

Boxset / Compilation · 2005 · Big Band
Cover art 4.00 | 1 rating
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js
These Quadromania CD compilations are extremely inexpensive, which makes them suspect at first, but this four CD collection of Fletcher Henderson tracks called “Wrappin It Up” is surprisingly good, especially when you consider the bottom barrel price. Fletcher Henderson is probably the most under appreciated figure in popular jazz history. A contemporary and early band mate of Louie Armstrong, and a precedent for Ellington’s orchestra, Henderson’s importance in the development of jazz is topped only by Armstrong, Ellington and Charlie Parker. If Henderson remains a mystery to you, then this compilation will make for an excellent introduction.

Jazz music was at a peak in the late 20s and early 30s, when most of these tracks were recorded. The music had become far more sophisticated and arranged after leaving New Orleans for New York, but at the same time, this period of jazz was often more experimental and devilishly intense than much of the swing music that followed in the late 30s. Listening to these tracks reveals complex and difficult arrangements topped with crazy hot solos, all played with mind boggling ease and confidence by artists who often went on to more fame with the Ellington Orchestra and others. Coleman Hawkins is all over this collection, but you will also hear the early careers of Russell Proscope, Rex Stewart, Tommy Ladner, Buster Bailey, Don Redmond and many other greats. The recorded sound and flow from track to track is quite good. Some CD collections of older music feature jarring differences between tracks, fortunately there is none of that on “Wrappin It Up”.

Sometimes modern (especially Western) ears have a hard time hearing details in music like this. The big sound of rock and RnB that originated in the 70s becomes a barrier to understanding music from other time periods and cultures where ‘production’ is non-existent. Whether its Indonesian Gamelan, Bach harpsichord inventions, early blues or 20s jazz, the difference from post 70s music is remarkable, and sometimes preferred by some. The other barrier to understanding 20s jazz is its tonality. This was a time when the brightness of major scales was the dominate sound. Since the 50s, the minor blues scale has come to dominate Western music including hard bop, modern blues, hard rock, metal, modern RnB and hip-hop. Some may interpret the bright sound of late 20s jazz as ‘happy’, but a giddy cocaine fueled exuberance would probably be a more fitting description. This was, after all, music for gangsters and illegal partiers, and it was outlawed in many parts of the US.

The big difference in this music compared to jazz today is in the ensemble work. The guys in Henderson’s band traveled together and played long strings of one night gigs while playing the same tunes night after night. The way this band can move together while playing high speed complex syncopated arrangements is something you will not hear today because today’s musician has to play in four or five different ensembles just to keep busy and pay the bills. Unfortunately, the sort of commitment needed to play in an ensemble like this is not usually available anymore.

PRINCE Prince

Album · 1979 · Jazz Related RnB
Cover art 3.33 | 6 ratings
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siLLy puPPy
Despite the debut album being a complete commercial flop, PRINCE quickly followed up with a successor releasing his eponymous second album in October of 1979 and once again basically every single aspect of the album was handled by PRINCE himself including the songwriiting, production, arrangements and musical performances. This album showed PRINCE expanding his eclectic tentacles even further into the nooks and crannies of the musical world. While the album still retains a dominant R&B and synth funk presence, on album number two we get a lot more indicating telltale signs that the future purple one is unfurling his talents just a like a lotus flower unfolding its petals into full bloom. He is also showing first signs of loving to be naked! A shirtless PRINCE graces the cover and he is gleefully riding a unicorn unclothed on the back.

While the first couple of tracks are his usual shtick of synth funk verging on disco exclusively done in falsetto, on the third track “Sexy Dancer” we get a glimpse into some of the future purple one’s sound with a funk guitar taking control fortified with a groovy bass line and a healthy libido oriented lyrical litany complete with heavy breathing rhythmic accompaniments. Actually an early glimpse into the mega-hit “Kiss” to emerge a few years later.

Unfortunately some of my least favorite aspects of PRINCE are present here as well. I’m speaking of the over sappy ballads displayed here with “When We’re Dancing Close And Slow.” OK, maybe if you’re all hot and bothered by the album cover then this might do it for ya, but i’m sorry it’s not working for yours truly. Same goes for “With You,” the very next track which shows that the purple one hadn’t quite learned the art of pacing upbeat tracks with the slower moon howlers that i can’t stand. “Still Waiting” is the exception where PRINCE has a catchy piano man persona and has a beautiful melody that technically is a ballad but has a mid-tempo beat and a more interesting flow of chords, rhythms and harmonies.

The sixth track “Bambi” changes everything and debuts PRINCE’s brilliance of incorporating rock ’n’ roll into his synth funk visions. This track has a nice distorted guitar accompanied by a more real rocking drum beat. While this one rocks complete with little licks that would develop into PRINCE’s unique guitar soloing style, this one is still in tandem with the rest of the album with his falsetto only vocal style and funkified song structure. Still though, a prototype for his more rocking mojo of future hits such as “Let’s Get Crazy” and “U Got The Look.”

While this second album failed to score any significant chart climbing singles, it did hit number 22 on the Billboard album charts and was certified gold in the not too distant future. Despite the lack of singles it did however hit the R&B charts with “I Wanna Be Your Lover” and “Why You Wanna Treat Me So Bad?.” This album is also notable with the eighth track “I Feel For You” which was remade by Chaka Khan in 1984 and proved to be a huge hit which would be the first of songs written by PRINCE and performed by others to prove major chart success. Proof that PRINCE was first and foremost a songwriting behemoth who would go on to write countless tracks for other artists (think The Time, Stevie Nicks and of course Sinead O’Connor as well as the countless acts he spawned over the years.)

JIMMIE LUNCEFORD Lunceford Special

Boxset / Compilation · 1967 · Big Band
Cover art 4.00 | 1 rating
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js
About half of the Jimmie Lunceford compilations out there are titled “Lunceford Special”, named after his most popular song, so to specify which “Lunceford Special” this review is covering, it should be pointed out that this is from the Columbia Hall of Fame series released in the late 60s. Even non-jazz fans will recognize the names of Count Basie and Duke Ellington as being two of the greatest big band leaders of all time, but only the hardcore jazz fans know that in his heyday, Lunceford’s band was often more popular and more musically formidable than either of those two giants. Why Lunceford’s popularity has waned over time is easily explained by the fact that he passed away a couple decades before the other two, and did not get a chance to further improve his legacy and fame in the more promotion savvy 1950s-70s. More than likely, more passing of time will work to Lunceford’s advantage and hopefully he will eventually return to his place as big band leader supreme. To understand why Lunceford was so popular, you only have to give this record a spin and you will hear how hot and dynamic his band was.

While Ellington’s band was known for their smooth sound and classical ambitions, and Basie’s band was known for its hard rockin dance beat, Lunceford’s band fell in between the two. Lunceford’s band had a driving rhythm section which made them a favorite amongst the dancers, but their arrangements are deceptively complex, full of interesting change-ups, counter melodies and rhythmic juxtapositions. Their set material often featured popular sing along melodies for the dancers, cloaked in crazy jazz arrangements for the more serious listener.

Of the two sides of this LP, side two is the better. On this side we get less of the ‘jokey’ double entendre dirty lyrics of side one, and more arrangements that feature hot solos and complex ensemble work, and no vocals. Most of the tunes on here are from 1939, when the band was at a peak, but “Flaming Reeds and Screaming Brass” from 1933 is a real eye-opener with its fierce energy and bizarre arrangement that foreshadows Charles Mingus. Another top cut is title tune “Lunceford Special”, with its simple but effective repeating riff that conjures up instant images of dance floor mayhem. The sound on this album is not too bad, it sounds like a lot of high end was cut off of the eq to get rid of surface noise, there is always a trade off in dynamics when you do that. Also, the copy I have was ‘re-channeled’ for stereo, always a bad idea and an unfortunate practice that faded with the end of the 70s.

LARD FREE I'm Around About Midnight

Album · 1975 · Jazz Related Improv/Composition
Cover art 4.00 | 1 rating
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Miler72
Not common for the 1970s, there was a one year gap for Lard Free, probably due to Gilbert Artman having trouble keeping a steady lineup. It's obvious he was really doing his homework between albums, while the production quality isn't much improved, it seems the music has improved some (although I do enjoy the debut, I'm Around About Midnight seems less primitive). The music takes on a stronger Heldon feel to it, which comes as no surprise as Richard Pinhas appears on this album, giving his trademark Fripp-like guitar work and synths, but the jazz elements lacking on an Heldon album are present, thanks to the use of saxes. Some of the album has a bit of a world music feel to it, almost a Balinesian gamelan feel, but I believe these are just vibes, not gamelan. I'm fond of this part that starts off with gentle Hammond organ and pinging synths that give away to sequenced synthesizer passage. "Pâle Violence Under A Réverbère" has a King Crimson/Heldon thing going on, but the drums have that strangely '80s gated reverb/big snare sound, how that was done in 1975, I don't know how, and I own the original LP on the Vamp label, so it wasn't like it was remixed when reissued (like what ZZ Top did with their early albums in the 1980s when they reissued them on CD or the Alan Parsons Project did with Tales of Mystery & Imagination). While their third is by far their best, this is their second best and still worth getting.

LARD FREE Gilbert Artman's Lard Free

Album · 1973 · Jazz Related Improv/Composition
Cover art 4.00 | 1 rating
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Miler72
Lard Free was essentially Gilbert Artman's project, so each album featured totally different lineups. This was the debut. It's a strange combination of noisy, jazzy prog rock and electronic music. The production quality isn't that great, it seems to have that home made quality, which I guess was intentional. You might notice a rather familiar bass line when you start playing this album! Yes the famous bass line you hear on Miles Davis' Bitches Brew! If King Crimson tried Bitches Brew, this is basically what you get! Lots of heavily distorted Fripp-like guitar and that bass line. Much of the rest is similar pattern, between tripped out synth-dominated electronic passages, and noisy, Crimson-like passages. I am particularly fond of " Livarot Respiration", really nice, mellow jazzy passage with sax and vibraphone. Musically, this is a bit like a more jazzy version of Heldon (in fact, their second album I'm Around About Midnight features none other than Richard Pinhas). I'm glad to discover Lard Free (I knew of them for years, but didn't buy any of their albums until 2013). While I feel their third album (frequently called III or Spirale Malax) is their best one, and the one to start if you're not familiar with Lard Free, this too is worth having.

FARMERS MARKET Surfin' USSR

Album · 2008 · (Post-70s) Eclectic Fusion
Cover art 3.50 | 1 rating
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siLLy puPPy
FARMERS MARKET is yet another wacky band emerging from Norway and SURFIN’ USSR seems to be the album of choice by many fans and the only one i’ve heard so far simply because it is so raved about. The band started out as a free jazz quintet fresh out of the conservatory in Trondheim but soon unshackled themselves from all traditional norms and started to incorporate rock, pop, bluegrass, classical and their signature adoptive sounds such as Balkan and Bulgarian folk music. Throw in some surf guitar, some progressive time signature mind bleeps and you got an interestingly weird band on your hands. Yep, the kind i relish and seek out constantly!

While this band covers many genres the main gist here is energetic Balkan folk music with a couple tracks heading to Bulgaria for inspiration. One thing is for sure. These guys can really play their instruments with a technical prowess unmatched in most fusion arenas where rock meets jazz with ethnic world influences vying for control. Between the jagged rhythmic patterns that stop and go at breakneck speeds and the lovely melodic developments of the traditional scales and instruments leading the musical pack, i’d be tempted to give this a whopping five stars like many have due to the excitement generated in some of the cream of the crop deliveries on this one.

FARMERS MARKET unfortunately, to my ears, suffers some disappointing attributes that don’t get me as excited as this album as many others have made it out to be. First and foremost it’s inconsistent. It starts off strong on Parts 1 and 2 of the title track with energetic surf guitar ceding to Balkan folk instruments and scales usurping any Western musical agenda. The main instruments are the kaval, a chromatic end-blown flute that is the famous sound of the Balkans and Turkey as well as the gaida which is a type of bagpipe most popular in Macedonia and Bulgaria. The execution of these instruments is quite well performed but as a major connoisseur of Balkan gypsy music i have to state that i find them simply copying the styles of existing folk music of the region and not really adding a lot to it except for speedier chops and exaggerated time sigs.

There are several tracks on here that are pure gold. “Anyone Who Remembers Vladiwoodstock Wasn’t There!” is not only a clever title but has the coolest funky bass line with an almost Klezmer type of feel making me think more of the Sinai peninsula rather than the Balkans. “To Hell And Baku” is another golden moment with a thrashy metal type of intro before breaking into a hyperactive Balkan folk riff that incorporates some killer guitar and off-kilter proggy time sigs. “From Prussia With Love” is another highly energetic proggy number with a clean jazz guitar keeping the rhythm and a highly caffeinated kaval taking the energy to new levels creating one of the coolest tracks on the album complete with the way cool accompanying percussion of the Indian tambura, bongos and freaked out bass line which is followed by the outstanding “Red Square Dance” which is my favorite track with the traditional Balkan folk on full speed going on here. The kaval is just off the hook in the prog department delivering stunning hooks and this sounds sort of like a traditional Balkan band gone maaaaaad!

While those highlights are worth the price of admission there are also some tracks that totally rub me the wrong way. First up is the uninspiring cover of Gerry & The Pacemakers “Ferry Cross The Mersey” which here becomes “Lodtschitze Mini Maritza” which sounds totally out of place on this album, the mediocre “The Dismanting Of The Soviet Onion Made Us Cry” which is rather insipid and rather dull and the other out of place track here “Steroid Train Trip” which sounds like a Bela Fleck and the Flecktones reject with it’s banjo inspired jazz-fusion approach. What really irks me most about this album is that it has two totally incongruent tracks that are basically Bulgarian vocal folk music tracks that are typical of the region and much better done by the international superstars Le Mystere des Voix Bulgares or also known as the Bulgarian State Radio & Television Female Vocal Choir.

Overall i don’t feel this band has learned how to seamlessly blend all these styles together in a way that the much better disciplined Secret Chiefs 3 has managed to blend such disparate influences into a new kind of whole. Spoiled am i with their ability to do so but FARMERS MARKET’s SURFIN’ USSR simply sounds like it’s trying to take on too many styles and influences too fast resulting in a stilted delivery as the album unfolds. Where it’s great, it is astounding but where it fails, it feels like a major let down leaving a lopsided disappointing feel as the final result. This is the only album i’ve heard by them and i certainly haven’t written them off but if this album represents their peak then i’m afraid they don’t stand a chance in the eclectic global fusion world where bands like Secret Chiefs 3, Atomic Ape and a whole new school of newbies are taken global fusion to new levels and beyond. An intriguing album that falls short of expectations but there are certainly some exciting moments on this one.

DON CHERRY Organic Music Society

Live album · 1972 · World Fusion
Cover art 3.50 | 4 ratings
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siLLy puPPy
Every once in a while i pick up an album simply because the album cover artwork is just so beautiful that i just have to buy it so i can hear what kind of music lurks inside accompanying such visual beauty. Such was the case with DON CHERRY’s 1972 foray into his spiritual jazz meets ethnic world fusion album ORGANIC MUSIC SOCIETY which has one of the most colorful and stimulating wrap around album covers i’ve ever seen especially in a musical genre that tends to be conservative more often than not displaying the artists in some uninspiring pose with unobtrusive colors and settings. I actually picked up the modern CD version which is a faithful representation of the original vinyl LP only reduced in size complete with all the inner artwork and as a bonus a big fat little booklet that explains everything about this album including all kinds of juicy details of how the journey of ideas unfolded for such CHERRY’s growing interest in global fusion and how it all came together complete with archival photos as icing on the cake. Sold!

What i was expecting was the usual avant-garde free form jazz that CHERRY dished out in the 60s but what i heard instead was not only surprising but made me realize that ORGANIC MUSIC SOCIETY was actually his first effort in fusing world ethnic forms of music with his unique style of jazz playing and this could unofficially be thought of as the very first Codona album as 2/3 of the band is here and this was CHERRY’s first formal collaboration with berimbau player and percussionist Nana Vasconcelos. As the CD begins it doesn’t take long to realize that this isn’t a jazz album at all but a more eclectic album that does its best to incorporate as many sounds from across the globe as possible with only the occasional trumpet presenting itself on only a handful of tracks representing the world of jazz.

The album begins with “North Brazilian Ceremonial Hymn” which is basically a long drawn spiritual chant with some sort of drone accompanying a repetitive litany of wordless vocalizations and a parade of percussion that alternates between some kind of bells jingling and other shaky things. The opening track does more than establish ORGANIC MUSIC SOCIETY as a non-jazz dominated album but also sets the tone for a contemplative and meditative experience where the listener is hypnotized by the swell of repetitive passages that only vary slightly from one measure to another. Whereas the opening track commences with nary a jazz instrument nor syncopation to be found, others such as the second track “Elixir” while not jazz per se do contain a jazz trumpet solo where CHERRY leaves his unequivocal sound after a haunting ethereal opening and in the midst of an energetic African rhythmic section where he has license to pierce the din with his high pitched squeals like an elephant trampling through the jungles of the Congo.

ORGANIC MUSIC SOCIETY was originally released as a double vinyl LP and just barely fits onto one modern day CD at a bloated running time of 79:35. I have to admit that this is a brilliant album that encompasses a wide swath of global timbres, styles and rhythms but at the same time it’s hard to take in on a single listen as it tends to wear out its welcome towards the end where i start itching to hear something else more energetic. A great start indeed for CHERRY’s expedition into the sonic possibilities of eclectic world jazz fusion but ORGANIC MUSIC SOCIETY seems like it could have been subjected to a little more editing and / or sprucing up in the experimental department but then again i’ve already been spoiled by the superior future Codona albums that would take the approach of this album and refine it into a more sophisticated tapestry of influences. This album does deliver in its ORGANIC approach nevertheless and truly feels like it was birthed in the experimental energies of the 1972 timeline. While not being my top pick for a world jazz fusion album, this album definitely has a nice meditative global feel to it that warrants a listen although best digested in partial samplings at any given time instead of a single sprawling experience since the tracks are all interesting examples of global world fusion but at the same time don’t always hang together so well. Still though, more than enough here to recommend.

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