Jazz Related Electronica/Hip-Hop

Jazz music community with review and forums

The Jazz Related DJs and Electronica genres at JMA are for artists who create jazz related music with turntables, samplers, sequencers and the occasional live musician.

JMA is only interested in fully developed sophisticated jazz influenced music. We do not list generic trip-hop, internet radio 'chill' tracks or other types of music built with obvious repeating looped samples.

It could be argued that improvised poetry to a syncopated beat is just another form of jazz. For this reason, JMA maintains a select cadre of rap artists chosen for their influence on the development of the genre, or for their close relationship to the greater world of jazz.

jazz related electronica/hip-hop top albums

Showing only albums and live's | Based on members ratings & JMA custom algorithm | 24 hours caching

KENDRICK LAMAR Untitled Unmastered. Album Cover Untitled Unmastered.
KENDRICK LAMAR
4.77 | 4 ratings
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KENDRICK LAMAR Damn Album Cover Damn
KENDRICK LAMAR
4.79 | 3 ratings
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TALVIN SINGH OK Album Cover OK
TALVIN SINGH
4.59 | 4 ratings
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ERIC B. & RAKIM Don't Sweat The Technique Album Cover Don't Sweat The Technique
ERIC B. & RAKIM
4.50 | 3 ratings
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NUJABES Modal Soul Album Cover Modal Soul
NUJABES
4.33 | 3 ratings
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NUJABES Metaphorical Music Album Cover Metaphorical Music
NUJABES
4.17 | 6 ratings
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APHEX TWIN Selected Ambient Works 85-92 Album Cover Selected Ambient Works 85-92
APHEX TWIN
4.17 | 3 ratings
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SQUAREPUSHER Feed Me Weird Things Album Cover Feed Me Weird Things
SQUAREPUSHER
4.00 | 5 ratings
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BUCKETHEAD Monsters And Robots Album Cover Monsters And Robots
BUCKETHEAD
4.05 | 3 ratings
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FLYING LOTUS Cosmogramma Album Cover Cosmogramma
FLYING LOTUS
3.94 | 9 ratings
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SQUAREPUSHER Just a Souvenir Album Cover Just a Souvenir
SQUAREPUSHER
3.96 | 6 ratings
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ANIMATION Agemo Album Cover Agemo
ANIMATION
3.98 | 4 ratings
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This list is in progress since the site is new. We invite all logged in members to use the "quick rating" widget (stars bellow album covers) or post full reviews to increase the weight of your rating in the global average value (see FAQ for more details). Enjoy JMA!

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SQUAREPUSHER
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jazz related electronica/hip-hop Music Reviews

BLANKFOR.MS BlankFor.ms, Jason Moran, Marcus Gilmore : Refract

Album · 2023 · Jazz Related Electronica/Hip-Hop
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js
Attempts to combine electronic artists with jazz artists in a recording or performance setting can often be clumsy and ineffective, often leaving the two camps in separate worlds while sharing the same space. Patrick Gleeson’s work with Herbie Hancock was successful, but they were the exception. Since the early 90s or even earlier, many contemporary acid jazz and nu jazz artists have made extensive use of electronics to good effect, but any attempt to fuse an electronic performer with a live band usually ends up with nothing more than some gratuitous scratching and repetitive sample bites that don’t really do a lot for the spirit of live improvisation.

In 2023, sound artist BlankFor.ms (Tyler Gilmore) set out with a new project in which he manipulated the live performances of pianist Jason Moran and drummer Marcus Gilmore and the result is one of the more successful mergers of live electronic artist and jazz artist to date, and it is all presented on Tyler’s album, “Refract”. In this performance, Marcus and Moran improvise while Tyler loops there efforts on the fly and in general morphs and bends what they play into new shapes. Their interplay is absolutely seamless, it is really hard to tell what is being played and what has already been played and is undergoing treatments, it’s a truly captivating performance and a real breakthrough in the world of improvisation. It doesn’t hurt that such creative and eclectic musicians such as Jason and Marcus are involved, Moran in particular is probably one of the most versatile and creative pianists happening today.

The music is very varied, moving from intense atonality to drifting ambience and many points in between. Some highlights include “Inward Curve”, on which Tyler takes Marcus’ busy drum work and turns it inside out while Moran takes flight on a solo. “Tape Loop A” also takes drumnbass type beats and scrambles them up. “Release”, features Moran’s piano work while Tyler grabs bits and pieces and loops them. This sort of busy activity is the highlight of the album, but there is also a fair amount of ambient tracks as well. The ambient tracks can be effective, but this sort of thing has been done before as some of this sounds like it could be on the next Roger Eno album. Unfortunately, for the last third of the album Marcus is barely present which is a shame. If these three do another project together, it would be nice to hear more of the scrambled beats and intense piano work outs.

KRZESIMIR DĘBSKI Krzesimir Dębski & Tadeusz Sudnik : Borello

Live album · 2023 · Jazz Related Electronica/Hip-Hop
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snobb
My interest to music comes from my early teens, and Polish music was a huge influence during my formative period. Two years of accordion private lessons didn't impress me a lot, later I tried to become a drummer in a school band, without a significant success. My hometown, Vilnius, in Russia's occupied Lithuania wasn't a very inspiring place, with a lot of people in gray military uniforms, dark blue militiamen and civilians, wearing same gray clothes, usually silent. There was quite a lot of music on state TV and radio stations (private stations didn't exist at all at that time), but it was predominantly kitsch versions of (mostly Russian) folklore and hyper-enthusiastic Soviet propaganda-pop. Plus some classics – classics sounded especially boring for my ears.

And there was Polish Radio – one of two foreign radio stations I could listen to regularly. The other was a BBC Russian services, banned in the Soviet Union. Its signal was usually weak, but time to time it was possible to listen to their excellent Friday night radio shows, dedicated to rock music.

Differently, Polish Radio had a strong and high quality radio signal. There was lot of short talks in a language I didn't really understand, and a lot of music between the talks too. I learned my basic Polish trying to understand what the voices on the radio were talking about, and my musical aesthetics were formed under the heavy influence of music I listened to regularly on Polish Radio.

That music was similar to what I already knew, but different at the same time. Doesn't matter, what genre it was – pop, rock or even r'n'b and reggae, it sounded richer, more full-bodied, brighter, much more colorful. As a teenager, I had no idea, where this difference came from. Only later I find out, that this difference in sound (and in general aesthetics too) was the result of different arrangements. It was quite often JAZZY ARRANGEMENTS, making almost any music sound fabulous.

Some years and decades later I found the genius of Tomasz Stanko trumpet, jazz, Polish fusion and many more. But even now, from almost half-a-century time distance, Poland for me is a land where all music sounds jazzy. Crossing the country by car, every time I impatiently wait for the moment when my car's radio is able to catch the first possible Polish radio station – almost always I get that very specific soulful, sometimes slightly melancholic jazzy sound of Poland, doesn't matter who plays.

It's a shame on me. I didn't know before who Krzesimir Dębski and Tadeusz Sudnik are. True, I knew Polish fusion stars from the 80s, The String Connection, and I knew Stanko's Freelectronic project, but I never knew the names of both band's members. As a foreigner, I knew even less about Krzesimir Dębski's films soundtracks and classical works. Then, two Polish jazz seasoned artists' new work comes for me as a discovery of sort.

Listening to a lot of jazz (hundreds of albums annually) for a few decades, it's not a regular situation when you start listening to a new album of seasoned artists without expectations, you are not familiar with their music and simply don't know what to expect. It's quite a good thing, history teaches us that expectations often lead to disappointments.

So, Krzesimir Dębski and Tadeusz Sudnik Borello, present a comeback album after long pause. Four longish (between 9+ and almost 15 minutes long) free form compositions, recorded by a duo of violinist/keyboardist and a live electronics wizard. The music which could be formally tagged as “jazz-electronica” has nothing in common with New Millennium jazz related electronica, like played by Squarepusher or Flying Lotus. With an absolute dominance of analog sound, this album's electronics are much closer to American composer and early Moog player Richard Teitelbaum's music.

Album's opener, “Borro”, dedicated to Tomasz Stanko, sounds very much as a variation of early Miles abstract fusion, with Dębski's violin soloing instead of trumpet. Warm and tuneful, this song sounds very much as if had been composed, not fully improvised. “Rebo”, the album's longest piece, is of a more amorphous nature, centered around vintage electronic rhythms. Quite relaxed though.

“Lerro” is a mid-tempo song with violin soloing over the (warm) synth loops and bubbles, in moments quite unpolished and almost nervous. “Rero”, the closer, same way as a previous piece, sounds more improvised, freer than the first two album's songs. Still, there are lot of tuneful snippets and emotively colored violin.

Not really a revolutionary album, still it's a very impressive standing alone work of two masters. Maturity, knowledge of the past world without even traces of sentimental melancholy, and that soulful jazzy feel so important for Polish jazz. Bravo!

MADLIB Doom And Madlib=Madvillain : Madvillainy

Album · 2004 · Jazz Related Electronica/Hip-Hop
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CounterClockWorld
This album, man this album. Madvillainy is a collaborative album between the lengadry Midlib and the lengadry MF DOOM to form the even more lengadry Madvillain. At the time DOOM and Madlib were underground figures within the hip hop circuit and these artists were powerhouses DOOM making such classics as Operation Doomsday, MM...Food and Vaudeville Villain, Madlib on the other hand was mainly known for his work as Quasimoto and this album The Unseen, so to see these two together is a match made in heaven. The album is chock full with samples from lots of from genres of music making feel more abstract its great probably my favorite samples here are from Progressive Rock artists FRANK ZAPPA and GENTLE GIANT as well as the other little obscure snippets Madlib digs up, instrumentally this almost feels like a fusion of The Unseen and J DILLA's Donuts it's a sound that can only be found on a Stones Throw record, lyrically DOOM weirdly reminds me of TOM WAITS not only do they both have gravely voices but DOOM is able to tell weird stories through his abstract lyrics for example the track Meat Grinder is about his encounter with a schizophrenic sex worker its really something only DOOM could make, this entire album is a treasure and is worth every minute of your time

ERIC B. & RAKIM Follow The Leader

Album · 1988 · Jazz Related Electronica/Hip-Hop
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js
Eric B. & Rakim have long been recognized as one of the top innovators in hip-hop, but they never seem to get recognition for one of their more notable achievements, bringing the musical worlds of jazz and hip-hop together in ways that made sense. Early rap tended to either be ‘electric boogaloo’ oriented, or centered around rock beats like “We Will Rock You”. While there was a trend developing, from bands such as Stetsasonic, to bring in superficial jazz elements such as a trumpet solo or acoustic bass sample, it wasn’t until Eric and Rakim started releasing albums that a true fusion of jazz and hip-hop happened. Eric’s samples and DJ slices favored classic funk and soul jazz, while Rakim’s rhymes on the mic had a syncopated swing and non-stop flow that had him sounding like the Charlie Parker of rap. Although the pair’s first album contained much potential, it wasn’t until the sophomore follow up, “Follow the Leader”, that Eric and Rakim brought the jazz and funk elements much more into the mix.

“Follow the Leader” is the perfect title for this album because it went on to be imitated and followed by others for decades. Eric may not have been the first person to sample and loop a James Brown beat, but on this album he is one of first DJs to create a monster groove around such a technique. Needless to say, sampling Brown became an epidemic after a while, but it still sounds great on here. Sampling was still in its infant stage at this time, but Eric and crew have no problem creating mixes with soul jazz saxophone riffs, Middle Eastern melodies and funky bass lines. Most of the tracks are good, with possibly the best being “Musical Massacre”, which features a driving double time Afro-Latin riff reminiscent of Mandrill or Osibissa. There are a couple lackluster cuts, mostly a few instrumentals which sound dated and repetitious

PUBLIC ENEMY It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back

Album · 1988 · Jazz Related Electronica/Hip-Hop
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js
Very few albums have hit with the nuclear thunderclap impact of Public Enemy’s “It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back”. Although their first album had hinted at greatness, nothing could have prepared the world of popular music for the intense power of “It Takes a Nation …”. What Coltrane did to jazz and Hendrix did to rock, Public Enemy did to rap and hip-hop. Not only was the rap game affected by this release, but also the worlds of electronica, RnB, heavy rock and industrial music too. Bands and artists from many genres began to realize how much they could bring to their music with some creative sampling and production. Possibly even more important though, lead rapper Chuck D brought consciousness of what it meant to be a black man in the US to many people who probably would not have picked up this knowledge any other way. It wasn’t only the city youth who knew every word of these songs by heart, but many suburban kids were digging this too. Both musically and lyrically, this was one of the most influential albums of its time in any genre.

There are many who will probably never forget the first time they heard “Bring the Noise” blasting out of a pair of speakers. This album is no longer the shock it once was because so many have imitated it, but when it first came out, nothing sounded like this. Along with Chuck’s booming voice, fellow rapper Flava Flav’s humorous asides, and Terminator X’s funky sampled beats and sax riffs, you got this barrage of pure chaotic noise that worked perfectly with the music. The crescendoing cauldron of sounds that threaten to drown out Chuck only made his voice and words more powerful and urgent.

There is no dead air on here, every cut is dynamite. Some highlights include, "Night of the Living Baseheads", which has Chuck raging against crack addiction, “Cold Lampin with Flavor”, on which Flav spouts free wheelin nonsense over a funky beat, and the heavy rock drive of “She Watch Channel Zero”, which inspired both Slayer and Anthrax to perform this track with Chuck. After being in the forefront during the late 60s, politically driven African-American consciousness had taken a back seat during the me first materialistic 80s. With this album, Chuck D and his crew changed all that and brought their message of no sell out to cars, homes, parties and clubs all around the world.

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