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Samba

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Forum Name: General Music Discussions
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URL: http://www.JazzMusicArchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=858
Printed Date: 29 Nov 2020 at 11:54am
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Topic: Samba
Posted By: Atkingani
Subject: Samba
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 4:30pm
Everyone is bald to know that Samba is a genre/style of music 'brother' of Jazz and I think it deserves a tiny space here in JMA.

First, I'd like to show you the samba school battery and the way they play during the samba parade (a contest among schools that takes place every year during Carnival).

Leornard Bernstein once said that it should be impossible for him to command 300 persons being in the same level and dancing at the same time. Well, some dudes do it.


For more information about the samba schools, please check here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samba_school" rel="nofollow - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samba_school



Replies:
Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 4:34pm
Samba de raiz (Roots samba) is a sub-genre not related necessarily with Carnival parade. Anyway, composers are generally the same but the rhythm is cruder, traditional.

 


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 4:34pm
Caxambu is a samba sub-genre that keeps a more definite African flavor.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 4:51pm
Samba can be romantic too:




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 4:55pm
Maxixe is a kind of proto-samba... this song originally recorded in 1928 shows a mix between maxixe and samba.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:01pm
Here the 1916 original version of the so-called 1st samba. However, according to some musicologists this song was actually a maxixe.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:05pm
With Noel Rosa (1910-1937) the urban samba got its final shape - a feature that is copied until today. 

This song is from 1930.



This guy produced with only 26 years of age a tsunami of sambas and related songs hard to be reached.


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:10pm
Chico Buarque, the most prolific Brazilian popular composer is a die-hard fan of Noel Rosa.
http://www.jazzmusicarchives.com/buarque-chico.aspx?ac=buarq" rel="nofollow - http://www.jazzmusicarchives.com/buarque-chico.aspx?ac=buarq



This 1937 song is considered by many as the pinnacle of the urban samba. The cover shown above was done by Chico Buarque in 1984.



Posted By: Matt
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:29pm
Originally posted by Atkingani Atkingani wrote:

Everyone is bald to know that Samba is a genre/style of music 'brother' of Jazz and I think it deserves a tiny space her in the JMA.

First, I'd like to show you the samba school battery and the way they play during the samba parade (a contest among schools that takes place every year duirng Carnival).

Leornard Bernstein once said that it should be impossible to him to command 300 persons being in the same level and dancing at the same time. Well, some dudes do it.


For more information about the samba schools, please check here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samba_school" rel="nofollow - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samba_school
great stuff.......on to the next onesCool

-------------
Matt


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:32pm
Thanks, Matt... I'll try to show the many faces of Samba (just like Jazz) and put it in a chronological order whenever possible. Smile


Posted By: Matt
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:34pm
Originally posted by Atkingani Atkingani wrote:

Here the 1916 original version of the so-called 1st samba. However, according to some musicologists this song was actually a maxixe.


Ahh Yaa Yay...........absolutely beautiful, like some ole ghost coming from back then...Love itCool

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Matt


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:36pm
Back in the 1930s, while composers like Noel Rosa worked more in the urban side of samba other composers soldiered more to link samba with its African roots (origins of samba de raiz).

This song was first recorded in 1931.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:40pm
Meanwhile, some dreamers like Ary Barroso believed that samba could be the 'classical music' of Brazil. Amid his delirious he made this one well-known all over the world.

Here the original recording done in 1939.



Check the arrangement extremely bold for the time.



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:51pm
Samba is not only a brand of Rio de Janeiro. Actually it is composed in all parts of Brasil, like Bahia where they play samba in a different mood, more slow, sweeter and warmer.

Dorival Caymmi (1914-2008) was the most famed of the Bahia style samba composers.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:53pm
The truth is that the samba that Carmen Miranda presented in the USA was much more in the Bahia style than in the Rio de Janeiro style.

This song was composed by Dorival Caymmi around 1938.



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:59pm
São Paulo has its own samba style.

This song is a fine example. The original recording is from 1953 but this one was made in 1975.

 


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 6:04pm
It became obvious that coming from the same nest one day Samba and Jazz should join again. The result was Bossa Nova.




Posted By: Matt
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 6:22pm
After all that wonderful music.........Liked Ismael Silva and Ary Barrosa......something about that old stuff Hug
 
I don't have a lot of Brazilian.....but I have Caetano Velosa, Maria Bethania (his sister as you would know), Sergio Mendes of course, 1 Gilberto Gil and thats  his Bob Marley reggae album LOL, Hermeto Pascoal, Flora Purim but I really dug this one which I bought years back and I am slapping it in the player now. I got a couple more albums of Daniela Mercury ...the next was good but I found the other after too poppy for me.
 
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B000024LI2/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music" rel="nofollow">Feijao Com Arroz
 
 


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Matt


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 6:26pm
Originally posted by Matt Matt wrote:

After all that wonderful music.........Liked Ismael Silva and Ary Barrosa......something about that old stuff Hug
 
I don't have a lot of Brazilian.....but I have Caetano Velosa, Maria Bethania (his sister as you would know), Sergio Mendes of course, 1 Gilberto Gil and thats  his Bob Marley reggae album LOL, Hermeto Pascoal, Flora Purim but I really dug this one which I bought years back and I am slapping it in the player now. I got a couple more albums of Daniela Mercury ...the next was good but I found the other after too poppy for me.
 
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B000024LI2/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music" rel="nofollow">Feijao Com Arroz
 
 

CoolBeer


Posted By: js
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 6:38pm
I'll check all this out Guigo. Right now we probably put Samba records in Latin Jazz or possibly World Fusion if it is Samba mixed with other elements.


Posted By: Kazuhiro
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 6:41pm

Is Choro music distinguished from Samba?
Because I was not so well versed in traditional music of Brazil.

I often listen to MPB and Bossa Nova and become comfortable.



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 7:04pm
Originally posted by Kazuhiro Kazuhiro wrote:

Is Choro music distinguished from Samba?
Because I was not so well versed in traditional music of Brazil.

I often listen to MPB and Bossa Nova and become comfortable.


Yes, Kazuhiro... even though many samba composers did choro too.

Originally Choro was only instrumental, later some lyrics were added to choro.

To make things a bit confused there's also the sub-genre samba-choro, where the slow Choro pace is accelerated by the samba beat, like this one:



The original Choro song can be heard here (no lyrics):




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 7:07pm
Originally posted by js js wrote:

I'll check all this out Guigo. Right now we probably put Samba records in Latin Jazz or possibly World Fusion if it is Samba mixed with other elements.

Great, John.

Anyway, having a small space for samba (and related rhythms) here in the General Music Discussions is attractive too. Wink


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 7:33pm
Partido Alto is another subgenre of samba, coming from the deep favela backyards there where a whitie is allowed only with a kind of visa. Big smile

The African roots are so noticeable that in some parts they use basically Yoruba instruments while in other they use mainly Angola instruments.

Nelson Sargento, almost 90, is a survivor. Tereza Cristina is a new generation star.




Posted By: Matt
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 7:41pm
Originally posted by Atkingani Atkingani wrote:

Partido Alto is another subgenre of samba, coming from the deep favela backyards there where a whitie is allowed only with a kind of visa. Big smile

The African roots are so noticeable that in some parts they use basically Yoruba instruments while in other they use mainly Angola instruments.

Nelson Sargento, almost 90, is a survival. Tereza Cristina is a new generation star.


Love it...........still groovin'  at that age CoolClapClapClapClapClap

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Matt


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 9:32pm
While many artists tended to make Bossa Nova more jazzy others searched a bridge between Bossa Nova and Samba, being João Bosco a good example.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 9:42pm
Samba-Canção is a mix between Samba & Bolero, created back in the 1940s but still with many followers today.

Nana Caymmi, the daughter of Dorival Caymmi, composed and recorded this cool samba-canção just a few years ago.




Posted By: js
Date Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 10:05pm
Thanks a lot Guigo. We will sticky this thread, this will make an excellent reference tool.


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 12:04am
Originally posted by js js wrote:

Thanks a lot Guigo. We will sticky this thread, this will make an excellent reference tool.

Thumbs Up


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 4:23pm
Samba de breque (break samba) is noticeable for its broken musical phrases and spoken segments. 

This the style of the wise street guys where the late Moreira da Silva reigned absolutely.






Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 4:26pm
Samba-rock is the style that made Jorge Ben Jor famous since the 1960s. He also has a bunch of clones and covers.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 4:30pm
Samba-dance was a rhythm created in the 70s aimed to the disco fever.






Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 4:38pm
However, the samba de gafieira was and still is a favorite style in the night-clubs and dancings (gafieiras).






Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 10:41pm
Samba and Carnival form a perfect pair in the city of Rio de Janeiro.

Carnival needs a King and a Queen and every year, 2 or 3 months before Carnival there's a contest to select the new king & queen. Usually, the king is a fat guy (like Bacchus) and the queen is a gorgeous young lady and both need to be warm and know how to dance samba.

Link below shows the last contest which happened in the end of 2010.

DISCLAIMER: Images were shown in the Brazilian TV with no problems. However, if you have any restriction to beautiful women wearing tiny bikinis, please do not click on the link. Smile


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmM7_XY2DmQ" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmM7_XY2DmQ



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 29 Jul 2011 at 9:36pm
Tropicalismo was a cultural and musical movement in the 1960s that was a kind of parallel with the psych wave that occured there in the Northern Hemisphere.

Although not restricted to a specific musical style, those composers and arrangers of Tropicalism revisited samba with a toatlly new vision, including synths and electric guitars amid big orchestrations.

Here Caetano Veloso and his iconic 1968 song.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 29 Jul 2011 at 9:39pm
Back in the 1970s a new movement, Clube da Esquina, headed by Milton Nascimento mixed samba with prog-rock and Brasilian folk.

 


Posted By: js
Date Posted: 29 Jul 2011 at 9:44pm
Tropicalismo probably has a lot in common with what we call Exotica on this site.


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 29 Jul 2011 at 9:47pm
Originally posted by js js wrote:

Tropicalismo probably has a lot in common with what we call Exotica on this site.

Quite sure, although the 2 main names of the movement: Caetano Veloso & Gilberto Gil were later more identified with Latin Jazz or World Music. Smile


Posted By: Kazuhiro
Date Posted: 30 Jul 2011 at 12:16am

The video that Guigo had put here yesterday was very significant for me. Thank you.

This thread serves as a reference very much.

By the way, I buy "Previsao Do Tempo" of Marcos Valle before and it has been understood that it is a very wonderful album. It was a very progressive album for the item of MPB. I think that "Garra" is also wonderful. However, "Previsao Do Tempo" is overwhelming. Perhaps, I thought that Azimuth performed.

 



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 30 Jul 2011 at 7:30am
Kazuhiro-san, later I'll show some samples of what can be described as prog samba; actually the plain samba with influences borrowed from prog-rock via instruments and arrangements. 
The brain behind these songs were Rogério Duprat, that worked with Mutantes but later worked also with a bunch of samba singers and composers. Smile


Posted By: Matt
Date Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 4:20pm
Originally posted by Atkingani Atkingani wrote:

Samba and Carnival form a perfect pair in the city of Rio de Janeiro.

Carnival needs a King and a Queen and every year, 2 or 3 months before Carnival there's a contest to select the new king & queen. Usually, the king is a fat guy (like Bacchus) and the queen is a gorgeous young lady and both need to be warm and know how to dance samba.

Link below shows the last contest which happened in the end of 2010.

DISCLAIMER: Images were shown in the Brazilian TV with no problems. However, if you have any restriction to beautiful women wearing tiny bikinis, please do not click on the link. Smile


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmM7_XY2DmQ" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmM7_XY2DmQ

Scantily clad women, did you say Approve Thanks for the great music Atkingani and sharing your knowledge , still playing them and I will be back off and on to hear these again........Jorge Ben wonderful.........Samba Rock.....s Cool

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Matt


Posted By: js
Date Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 6:04pm
Yes, this is a thread you can visit over and over, excellent.


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 6:39pm
Thanks, fellows... Hug

More to come but this time in a slower pace. Wink


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2011 at 5:20pm
The afro-sambas were a series of songs made by Vinicius de Moraes and Baden Powell de Aquino back in the 1960s full of African religiosity.

The rhythm is simple, plain, raw, and lyrics act as a mantra.



Astrud Gilberto made a softer and more bossa-like version.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2011 at 5:30pm
'Berimbau' and 'Consolação' are two iconic afro-sambas. Here both songs are glued and interpreted by some of the greats: Vinícius, Jobim & Toquinho, supported by the discreet and elegant Miucha, Bebel Gilberto's mother.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2011 at 5:37pm
Cartola (1908-1980) needs a special page, a particular chapter to be written, to be studied, to be appreciated.

Oh, how we miss his songs, his lyrics, his tender voice, his humble manners, his shy smile... Cartola incorporates more than no one, the "Soul of Samba".




Posted By: js
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2011 at 5:44pm
I think I have one of those Baden Powell records, I will try to get the name for you.


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2011 at 5:44pm
Cartola again... "Roses do not speak"

"To the roses I complain
But silly me, roses do not speak
They simply exhale
The fragances taken from you"




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 5:34pm
When samba people does a party, they do it their way: Pagode.

What was originally something very informal became a commercial hit at least since the 1980s.

Pagode also provided a bridge between the urban middle-class and traditional samba players.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 5:40pm
Then the middle-class people themselves decided to be part of the party.

Monobloco, formed mainly by rock musicians, is a good example.








Posted By: js
Date Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 5:47pm
Hey, I found my old Baden Powell record, it is called "Tempo Feliz" and is on the Forma label.


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 5:49pm
Originally posted by js js wrote:

Hey, I found my old Baden Powell record, it is called "Tempo Feliz" and is on the Forma label.

Tempo Feliz (Happy Times) - 1966. Wink
 




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 5:57pm
When groups like Monobloco hit the streets it's like an invasion of joy and happiness made by more than half million followers. The old Rio de Janeiro downtown will never be the same.







Posted By: js
Date Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 6:11pm
That's the one, if I had thought about it, I could have interpreted the title, tempo = time of course, I assume this is Portugese not Spanish, but still, what citizen of the US does not know the Mexican Christmas song Feliz Navidad  LOL
feliz = merry = happy


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 05 Aug 2011 at 6:03pm
Marcha de Carnaval (Carnival March) is a mix of old styles like polka, mazurka and maxixe with samba. The infectious rhythm fits perfectly the joy of the indoor balls and the bliss of the street unnamed groups that are the real characteristic of Brazilian Carnival.

This one is probably the most known carnival march:


Here the way the Marx Brothers made it:


Now, Tom & Jerry:



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 05 Aug 2011 at 8:04pm
From the 1930s until the 1960s, a series of Brasilian movies were made aimed to the Carnival where the 'marchas' or simply 'marchinhas' provided the soundtrack - they were called 'chanchadas'.

In these chanchadas, the plot was light, generally around a theatric troupe or something and the plot and songs were also accompanied by humorous sketches. Since Carnival falls in February or March, the chanchadas were issued in October or November with the additional purpose to take advantage of the 'big summer vacations' of December/January.

Carmen Miranda (here with her sister Aurora) was a star of the first musicals which later were dubbed as chanchadas.

Virginia Lane was a kind of princess of the chanchadas.


However, the queen was really Emilinha Borba.



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 09 Aug 2011 at 7:04pm
Modern samba (a blend of traditional samba with bossa nova and other elements) wouldn't be the same without Chico Buarque.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 09 Aug 2011 at 7:09pm
Chico Buarque composed songs (alone or with friends) about every little bit of the Brazilian soul.

Here he teaches musically exactly how to prepare, eat and enjoy the "feijoada", one of our national dishes.






Posted By: jazzworldquest
Date Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 8:57pm
Talking about Samba, it's interesting that an Italian song became a famous standard due to Joao Gilberto interpretation!  
Estate(summer) has been composed in '60 by Bruno Martino & Bruno Brighetti.



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 9:28pm
Originally posted by jazzworldquest jazzworldquest wrote:

Talking about Samba, it's interesting that an Italian song became a famous standard due to Joao Gilberto interpretation!  
Estate(summer) has been composed in '60 by Bruno Martino & Bruno Brighetti.


Not to count the partnership of Chico Buarque with Italian composer Sergio Bardotti and the albums made by Ennio Morricone dedicated to Buarque's songs. Smile


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 9:39pm
Root's samba... pure samba.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 9:40pm
Soft samba.




Posted By: jazzworldquest
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2011 at 5:02pm
Originally posted by Atkingani Atkingani wrote:

Originally posted by jazzworldquest jazzworldquest wrote:

Talking about Samba, it's interesting that an Italian song became a famous standard due to Joao Gilberto interpretation!  
Estate(summer) has been composed in '60 by Bruno Martino & Bruno Brighetti.


Not to count the partnership of Chico Buarque with Italian composer Sergio Bardotti and the albums made by Ennio Morricone dedicated to Buarque's songs. Smile

Good point! Italian and Brazilian music have many things in common and the examples can continue!
From wikipedia: Some aspects of Brazilian culture are contributions of Italian, German and other European immigrants; came in large numbers and their influences are felt closer to the South and Southeast of Brazil.



Posted By: Matt
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2011 at 5:16pm
Talking about Italian Influences I found that Lucio Battisti's "Anima Latina" is a great example. Will add I love that album which I discovered through Mickey and Raff over at prog archives.
 
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B000006SS6/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music" rel="nofollow">Anima Latina
 
Hug


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Matt


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2011 at 9:50pm
Yes, seeing from the present perspective we may testify/verify that the bossa nova trend of late 50s and early 60s was much more worldwide than observed at the time. The rhythm with new sounds, new instruments and new arrangements influenced a lot of genres, not only modern jazz and fusion but also soft rock and pop music (check The Doors and Mamas & Papas, for instance).

This influence was not only felt in USA but France, Italy and Japan mainly. The 1966 French movie "A Man and a Woman" (Un homme et une femme) shows this influence clearly. In Italy, we had the famous composer and maestro Morricone trailing the samba & bossa nova fashion too.


Posted By: dreadpirateroberts
Date Posted: 14 Aug 2011 at 7:21am
Originally posted by Matt Matt wrote:

Talking about Italian Influences I found that Lucio Battisti's "Anima Latina" is a great example. Will add I love that album which I discovered through Mickey and Raff over at prog archives.
 
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B000006SS6/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=5174&s=music" rel="nofollow">Anima Latina
 
Hug


I'm with you there, Matt. I love this album (and pretty much all of his 60s/70s output.) He was amazing


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We are men of action. Lies do not become us.
http://www.jazzmusicarchives.com/dreadpirateroberts%28member%29.aspx?reviews=all/" rel="nofollow - Reviews...


Posted By: dionisio
Date Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 9:51am
Originally posted by Atkingani Atkingani wrote:

Everyone is bald to know that Samba is a genre/style of music 'brother' of Jazz and I think it deserves a tiny space her in the JMA. 

Samba and bossa nova they walk together, yes, but they can be totally two distinct things, I'm portuguese (i dunno if there is a brazilian in the forums that would be perfect to make this clear) i listen to the music from brazil since i remember walking, and in the jazz schools here you learn a lot of bossa (and believe, everytime you go to a jam with a girl.. if it depends on her, youll be playing bossas all night long ahah anyway, not revelant right now), my point is, even that the samba had a big influence on jazz, was the bossa nova that made the real influence, as sonority, structure or even chords and harmonic changes, what i'm saying is that i feel here a bit of a confusion between bossa and samba, at least i would never say that setence exactly like that, even that samba was, and it is, a huge influence in a lot of other music, it is bossa that deserves it space ( im not saying this as a smartass or whatever, just saying because i really think that they are two things totally different and when we think of the influence from brasil it seems more apropriate to say that bossa is the brother of jazz instead of samba). Samba is more like a traditional dance, a.. musical popular manifestation, bossa is something more like jazz, i can't explain it better, bt even if you think about the theoric part of it, the samba its not that close to jazz since its more a rhythm thing, while bossa.. damn.

to finish, i know, bossa nova is sub derived genre of samba, bt it seems more correct this way, and during the 50's the jazz musicians in america were crazy about bossa, not necessarly samba. Bt well, im not here to correct, i dont want to look like snobish, just trying to figure this out (maybe im just used to think it that way, and its because during all my entire life and through some jazz schools we say everytime bossa and not samba, taking samba as something different.. at the end of the day, its just a name ! Give us some brazilian rhythms and i'm happy ! )


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http://52nd.tumblr.com/" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: js
Date Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 10:27am
Guigo will be along, he is Brazilian and knows his music. Cool


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 2:48pm
Samba and jazz are considered siblings 'cause they have the same craddle, I mean, slaves and former slaves of African descent, with their parents and grandparents coming mainly from Western Africa (today Angola, Nigeria, Ghana, Togo, Benim). They have brothers, sisters and cousins throughout the Americas (Cuba, Jamaica, Venezuela, etc).

Those 2 genres also evolved, developed and reached maturity at the same time, from mid to late 19th Century up to early 20th Century but later they took different ways due to the different environments they lived. Being that after the 1910s and 1920s, the American entertaining and musical culture hold sway of the world and it was natural that samba started to undergo some influences from jazz and sooner two streams appeared: one more traditional and another more receptive to external sources.

During WWII more than 1 million US soldiers passed through Brazil ih their way to North Africa and Italy and we saw a two-way interchange: new forms of jazz coming and samba, chorinho and other Brazilian rhythms going. By late 40s, Lucio Alves, Dick Farney and a very young Tom Jobim were recording what was then called "samba-jazz".

Check here this 1947 song (10 years before bossa nova officially appeared):


Here another samba-jazz, this time from 1954:


The real and final bossa nova, a kid where samba and jazz were parents only appeared in 1958, with the now famous LP named "Canção do Amor Demais", which contained this landmark by Tom Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes:

BTW, the name bossa nova (new trend) was revived in 1958 since it has been used since the 1930s by Noel Rosa, Carmen Miranda and others and initially it referred to the orchestrated urban samba in opposition to the more raw root samba from the favelas. 

EDIT: although my username here is Atkingani everyone knows me by my nickname Guigo. Wink And welcome Dionisio. Smile


Posted By: dionisio
Date Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 2:54pm
Makes more sense like this then, i didnt knew any of these, in fact, the stupid thing is that we are teached that bossa nova is the biggest jazzy friend, and the only samba i know is the one from the samba schools and carnivals, not as influenced and influencee of jazz. Great great, thank you !

EDIT: Oh ! Agradecido ! Back to english, thank you again !


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http://52nd.tumblr.com/" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 2:58pm
Be welcome, Dionisio! Smile Seja bem-vindo!






Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 21 Aug 2011 at 8:08am
Chorinho is close to samba and close to jazz and a fine soundtrack for a Sunday meal with friends and family.

More:


And a bit more:



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 21 Aug 2011 at 8:18am
Even Chet Atkins experienced the chorinho taste:

The original here (the correct name is Waldyr Azevedo):





Posted By: Kazuhiro
Date Posted: 21 Aug 2011 at 7:54pm

Thank you for sharing the video,Guigo.
These Chorinho seems to be traditional music for people in Brazil.

It is very interesting. And, I thought about distinguished services of Joao Gilberto that developed those music to bossa nova again at the same time.



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 26 Aug 2011 at 6:01pm
Tim Maia, the king of samba-soul.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 26 Aug 2011 at 6:02pm
More Tim Maia (1942-1998).






Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 02 Sep 2011 at 4:39pm
"The clear tear on the dark skin
The clear rain on the dark night"




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 02 Sep 2011 at 4:49pm
Joyce Moreno, probably the best female composer of samba and bossa-nova - a great singer also.






Posted By: Kazuhiro
Date Posted: 02 Sep 2011 at 11:47pm

Thank you for sharing this. A lot of fans of Joyce exist also in Japan. She is a really good singer.

By the way, there is a singer of famous bossa-nova in Japan. It was said that it was born in Sao Paulo and had touched music though Lisa Ono was Japanese.

What do you think?



Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 03 Sep 2011 at 1:50pm
I know Lisa Ono and I like her, Kazuhiro-san. She actually was born in São Paulo, SP, Brasil. Smile


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 09 Sep 2011 at 11:47pm
Maria Bethania is a great Brazilian singer who also recorded a lot of sambas and the likes. Here she sings a Bahia-style samba composed by her brother Caetano Veloso.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 10 Sep 2011 at 12:01am
Maria Bethania sings Heitor Villa-Lobos.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 16 Sep 2011 at 6:46pm
Ivan Lins is a major name in the modern urban samba scenario.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 16 Sep 2011 at 6:53pm
Djavan is another Brazilian music master:




Posted By: js
Date Posted: 17 Sep 2011 at 7:43pm
I just realized a lot of the people you have listed here have not been added to the site yet. I'll start working on that over the next few days.


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 17 Sep 2011 at 7:58pm
Originally posted by js js wrote:

I just realized a lot of the people you have listed here have not been added to the site yet. I'll start working on that over the next few days.

Yes, Ivan Lins and Djavan are important names in Latin Jazz and World Music scenario.

BTW, thanks John for visiting this niche where we try to build a bridge between Jazz & Samba. Wink


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 23 Sep 2011 at 8:55pm
Nelson Cavaquinho (1911-1986) was a great samba composer but his songs were made famous through real singers, like Paulinho Moska, a new generation star.






Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 23 Sep 2011 at 8:59pm
The sublime Elis Regina recorded this fine tune composed by Nelson Cavaquinho.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 23 Sep 2011 at 9:03pm
Time for Gal Costa, a diva of the Brazilian musical scenario:






Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 23 Sep 2011 at 9:09pm
Zizi Possi, a fine singer (here singing with Chico Buarque, the song's composer):



Luiza Possi, following the steps of her mother Zizi:




Posted By: js
Date Posted: 23 Sep 2011 at 9:24pm
Originally posted by Atkingani Atkingani wrote:

Tim Maia, the king of samba-soul.



I missed this the first time around, Brazil meets Memphis, fun stuff, great singer too.


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 23 Sep 2011 at 10:10pm
Smile


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Sep 2011 at 9:58pm
Sidnei Miller (1945-1980), a great composer and fine singer who left us so soon....




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 27 Sep 2011 at 10:03pm
Paulinho da Viola, a master, sings a seminal samba composed by Noel Rosa.






Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 28 Sep 2011 at 4:52pm
Chico Buarque sings this song by late João Nogueira - a paean to samba and samba people.

The pics form a Pantheon with the Gods of Brazilian Music:






Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 29 Sep 2011 at 4:41pm
Dear friends,

I noticed today that some great and important Brazilian artists were recently added to JMA: Djavan, Ivan Lins, Maria Bethania and Sidney Miller. I'm in heavens... and I'm also a bit proud knowing that I helped a little with some posts.

Thank you!

P.S.: I wished this post might be my 100th... but I'll add 2 more videos in order to produly become a Senior Member of this excellent website. Smile


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 29 Sep 2011 at 5:04pm
A duo from 2 different dimensions: Milton Nascimento & Elis Regina.

Vera >>> Vera Cruz >>> Brasil.





Posted By: snobb
Date Posted: 29 Sep 2011 at 5:08pm
Originally posted by Atkingani Atkingani wrote:

Dear friends,

I noticed today that some great and important Brazilian artists were recently added to JMA: Djavan, Ivan Lins, Maria Bethania and Sidney Miller. I'm in heavens... and I'm also a bit proud knowing that I helped a little with some posts.

Thank you!

P.S.: I wished this post might be my 100th... but I'll add 2 more videos in order to produly become a Senior Member of this excellent website. Smile

Thank you for your valuable information on Brazilian music,with your help the site becomes more competent in that field too Smile


Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 29 Sep 2011 at 5:11pm
For my 100th post, this great song by Caetano Veloso with Rita Ribeiro.




Posted By: Atkingani
Date Posted: 01 Oct 2011 at 10:46am
Fellows, I'm making a soft lobby in order to have Sidney Miller's musical biography written by his older sister. Let's see if I'll succeed.

http://www.jazzmusicarchives.com/sidney-miller.aspx" rel="nofollow - http://www.jazzmusicarchives.com/sidney-miller.aspx

Lamp



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