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snobb View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 6:17am
added both, what is the source/author of Fonseca's bio?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 6:44am
^ www.oldies.com
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Aug 2011 at 1:02am
Lucian Ban

Twice nominated in 2005 & 2006 for prestigious Hans Koller “Best European
Jazz Musician Preis“Award, pianist, bandleader, composer & arranger LUCIAN
BAN is originally from Cluj, Transylvania, Romania. He currently lives in New
York City where is part of the next generation of performers & composers at
the forefront of contemporary modern jazz.
He leads several projects and writes innovative music that reinvents the idiom
of jazz music. His compositions are performed & recorded by other musicians
and ensembles.
Mr. Ban leads the super group ELEVATION featuring world renowned tenor
sax Abraham Burton, Nasheet Waits on drums and bassist John Hebert,
the ASYMMETRY Quartet feat. Jorge Sylvester (alto sax), Brad
Jones (bass) and Derrek Phillips or Gene Jackson (drums), and The TUBA
PROJECT a group featuring the famous Bob Stewart on (tuba), Alex
Harding (bari sax), Bruce Williams (alto sax) and Derrek Phillips (drums).
He co-leads with soprano sax great Sam Newsome “The Romanian-American Jazz Suite” group, a project
that presents Romanian Folk music from a jazz perspective. In 2008 their CD bearing the same name was released to critical acclaim to both US and European audiences, followed by successful tours on both sides of the Atlantic.
He also co-leads with bari sax extraordinaire Alex Harding the LUMINATION Ensemble a group that performs since
2002 featuring special guests such as: Sam Newsome, Art Baron, Jorge Sylvester, Josh Roseman, Bruce Williams and many more.
In 2003 the Lumination Ensemble featuring drum legend Barry Altschul was voted "One of the best shows of
2003 " by the All About Jazz Magazine NYC along with Cecil Taylor and Joe Lovano groups.
Mr. Ban has released 7 critically acclaimed albums as a leader for US and European based labels.
He performs and tours regularly with his projects and as a sideman in New York jazz clubs and Europe Festivals and between 2002 -2005 was a member of The BMI Composers Jazz Workshop. He also writes & arranges for Machito Orchestra and was commissioned by them to write a piece for their opening concert at Super Bowl 2002.
Lucian Ban also wrote music for more than 20 theater productions, film and ballet and for NYC Symphony Orchestra and in June 2001 he composed original music for the Theater/Dance Company MINUS. His original music for the theatre play “Philosopher Fox” produced by East River Comedia was nominated twice for the prestigious IT Awards in NYC. His last theatre score was for Saviana’s Stanescu ‘Waxing West” production at La Mama Theater in NY. Lucian Ban has received his degree in Contemporary Jazz Composition and Arranging from New School University in NYC. He also holds a degree in Philosophy from Bucharest University

from bio at artist's site


Edited by idlero - 02 Aug 2011 at 1:03am
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Aug 2011 at 1:06am
Aziza Mustafa Zadeh

Aziza Mustafa Zadeh was born in Baku, the Capital of Azerbaijan, to musical parents. Her father, Vagif Mustafa Zadeh, a pianist and composer, became famous by creating a fusion between jazz and the traditional Azerbaijani music known as mugam. His wife, Eliza Mustafa Zadeh, was a classically-trained singer from Georgia. As a young child Aziza enjoyed all forms of art - dancing, painting, singing - and at the age of 3 she appeared in public with her father, improvising with voice. But it was her talent for the piano that eventually shone through.

Having studied classical piano from an early age, and despite her enthusiasm for the compositions of JS Bach and Frederic Chopin, she soon began displaying a gift for improvisation. "I didn't practise enough," she admits. "If I don't feel like playing then I don't play." When her father died tragically on stage at the age of 39, it was a shocking blow to the young Aziza, and a major turning point in her life. Her mother's response to the crisis was to give up her own career as a classical singer and dedicate herself to nurturing her daughter's musical gifts. She now acts as her manager, and Aziza has come to rely on her judgment when she's writing or recording new pieces. "I trust her because she's extremely experienced as a classical musician and she had jazz experience with my father," Aziza points out. "And she knows a lot about music and history and literature."

When she was 17, she won the Thelonious Monk piano competition in Washington DC, playing some of Monk's compositions but in her own mugam-influenced style. Around the same time, she moved to Germany with her mother, and concentrated on developing her own distinctive musical direction.

In 1991, she released her debut album, entitled simply Aziza Mustafa Zadeh. It was immediately clear that this was an artist with an unusual and remarkable voice, able to blend her ethnic roots with both classical and jazz inputs. Early favourable impressions were reinforced by 1993's Always, which won Aziza both the ECHO Award and the German Phono Association's Jazz Award. So impressive were her talents that a prestigious squad of jazz musicians chose to join her in the studio for 1995's Dance Of Fire. Many less self-assured artists might have been overawed by a line up comprising guitarist Al Di Meola, bassman Stanley Clarke, former Weather Report drummer Omar Hakim and saxophonist Bill Evans, but once again Aziza produced an album unmistakeably imbued with her particular musical inclinations. 'Aziza is a genius, both as a composer and as a performer. Her music has much more meaning for me than just straight jazz because what I hear is her culture', said Di Meola. 'I hear Azerbaijan.'

With audiences now packing out her live concerts across Europe and beyond, from London and Paris to Istanbul and Tel Aviv, she created a mild frisson of excitement by wearing little more than long tendrils of hair on the sleeve of Seventh Truth (1996). Perhaps this image was designed to mirror the music within, which was mostly stripped down to solo piano and voice. The follow-up, Jazziza, mixed up her own compositions with jazz standards including My Funny Valentine and Dave Brubeck's Take Five.

Now there's Shamans, her first album under a new contract with Decca Records. The disc, recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London, draws together the varied strands of Aziza's music, brilliantly showcasing her classically-influenced piano playing on Bach Zadeh or Portrait Of Chopin, and giving full rein to her highly personalised vocal technique on compositions such as Ladies Of Azerbaijan or Sweet Sadness. The title piece is an unusual departure for Aziza, using only percussion, the chirruping of a cricket, and multiple overdubs of her own voice to evoke a mystical shadow-world. "For me, the spiritual part of life is the most important," she explains. "Shamans are special people - they can heal you."

from www.mymusicbase.ru
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Aug 2011 at 4:15am
Got both.

Edited by js - 02 Aug 2011 at 4:17am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 3:15am
Colin Stetson

Woodwind player Colin Stetson can play powerfully while circularly breathing for long periods, can draw multiphonics out of a sax with great skill, and can command an audience's attention with his focus and melodic improvisations. Stetson was born and raised in Ann Arbor, MI, where he became proficient on assorted saxophones, clarinet, and flute. He earned a degree in music from his hometown school the University of Michigan in 1997, studying with Roscoe Mitchell, Donald Sinta, and Christopher Creviston; afterward, he went on to study with Steve Adams and Henry Threadgill as well. While still in college, he co-founded Transmission (which later became Transmission Trio), and in 1998 he played with progressive Detroit-area jazz-rockers Larval on their Knitting Factory album Larval 2. He moved to the San Francisco Bay Area that summer along with the rest of Transmission, which released its first album in 1999. Stetson also branched out to play with the People's Bizarre, a chamber jazz group influenced by Eastern European folk, and Connector, which blended acoustic and electronic instrumentation. In the meantime, he also played live with the likes of Fred Frith, Peter Kowald, Ned Rothenberg, and Kenny Wollesen, and kept up his Detroit/Ann Arbor connections as well. Before moving west, he had played on his friend Recloose's debut EP for Planet E, and their collaborations continued over the years, culminating in the DJ's acclaimed full-length Cardiology in 2002. Also that year, Tom Waits tapped Stetson for reed work on his Alice and Blood Money albums, which led to significant exposure and a live performance on David Letterman. Stetson had a limited edition 3" CD release of a 2002 performance at the Artship in Oakland, and his full-length debut as a leader came in the summer of 2003 with the quintet recording Slow Descent. He also has his own website at www.colinstetson.com. ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide

I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 3:16am
Mathias Eick

Mathias Eick, is a Norwegian jazz musician born (26 June 1979) near the town of Eidsfoss in the county of Vestfold, Norway.

His main instrument is trumpet, but he also plays double bass, vibraphone, piano and guitar.

Mathias Eick has performed with several well-known music groups and musicians, Jaga Jazzist and “Trondheim Jazz Orchestra” together with Chick Corea and Pat Metheny.

Mathias Eick was awarded “The International Jazz Award for New Talent 2007”.

As a trumpeter, Eick is much in the tradition of such players as Kenny Wheeler, Chet Baker, Miles Davis, and Enrico Rava. Eick released his solo debut album, The Door, on ECM in 2008. That same year he was also featured on guitarist Jacob Young's ECM release Sideways. In 2011, Eick returned to his solo work with the more contemporary pop-oriented Skala.

from Allaboutjazz and www.mog.com



I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 3:43am
added both
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote andyman1125 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 8:45pm
100NKA
100nka (read: stonka) is a trio from Cracow, Poland. Lineup consist of percussionist Przemek Borowiecki, contrabassistAdam Stodolski, and guitarist Tomasz Leś.


Debuted in 2004 with the ‘Zimna Plyta’ album, recorded in the Alchemia club in Cracow with guest appearance of saxophonist and clarinettist Mikołaj Trzaska.

Improvised music by 100nka, with strong groove and free-jazz elements inspired by Miles DavisJohn ColtraneOrnette ColemanJim BlackEllery EskelinMedeski Martin & WoodDrew Gress DJ LogicYuka HondaDave HollandScorch TrioKen VandermarkHamid Drake,Joey BaronTim BerneHerb RobertsonAdam PierończykAntoni Ziut GralakFiszDave DouglasJohn Zorn,Marc DucretHilmar JenssonChris SpeedBen PerowskyMatthew ShippWilliam Parker.

Music created with use of 90 years old double bass, drums which remember birth of Polish Jazz and an electric guitar together with a broad arsenal of effects merging novelty with wealth of improvised music.

(Source: Last.fm)


Edited by andyman1125 - 03 Aug 2011 at 8:45pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 9:17pm
got it
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Aug 2011 at 8:37am
Lars Danielsson

The bassist Lars Danielsson is reknown and admired in the International Jazz world for his lyrical but groovy playing. Not least his capability to improve the appearance of the melody has brought him around the world in a number of various musical constellations.

Lars Danielsson was born in 1958 and was educated from the Music Conservatory in Gothenburg. Both on double bass, electric bass and cello - (his originally main instrument from the days at the conservatory) - he is an extraordinary soloist and accompanist, who gives the music edge and colourful temperament.

“Lars Danielsson Quartet” with former Miles Davis saxophonist David Liebman, pianist Bobo Stenson and legendary ECM drummer Jon Christensen has been receiving loads of recognition and awards during the 20 years in which the Quartet has existed. This Quartet has been a playground for Danielssons work as a composer and arranger, which he has extended to include both Symphony Orchestra and Big Band music. - During the previous years in co-operation with Danmarks Radios RUO Orchestra (a Symphony Orchestra) as a composer, arranger and producer. He was the conductor and composer of the Jazz Baltica Ensemble for two years.

Extracts from Lars Danielssons Discography: 8 solo-albums since 1980 both with “Lars Danielssons Quartet” and guests such as Alex Acuna and John Abercrombie,Bill Evans and Niels Lan Doky. Other notabilities whom Lars Danielsson has worked with is Randy and Michael Brecker, John Scofield, Jack DeJohnette, Mike Stern, Billy Hart, Charles Lloyd, Terri Lyne Carrington,Joey Calderrazzo,Gino Vanelli and Dave Kikoski. Lars Danielsson has also been a member of the “Trilok Gurtu Group” .

As a producer Lars Danielsson has been responsible for productions with Cæcilie Norby and The Danish Radio RUO Orchestra among others.


from Allaboutjazz..com


I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Aug 2011 at 8:57am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Aug 2011 at 2:10pm
Vassilis Tsabropoulos

Born in Athens Vassilis Tsabropoulos, who is considered to be one of the greatest Greek pianists, started playing the piano from a tender age. A prodigy, was winning music competitions from the age of ten, and after graduating from the Athens National Conservatory, continued his studies on an Aristotle Onassis Scholarship at the Paris Conservatory, the Salzburg Academy and the Julliard School, with great teachers including Rudolf Serkin and Tatiana Nikolayeva.

Tsabropoulos was an early achiever, winning the UNICEF competition when he was only ten. His distinctions and awards are too many and many are his collaborations with Orchestras in Greece and Europe, performing an ever-expanding repertoire in both recitals and concertos. He has future as soloist with Orchestras such as the Czech Philharmonic, the Yuta Symphony Orchestra, the Budapest Chamber Orchestra, the Sofia Philharmonic, the Italy Radio Orchestra, the Athens Camerata, the Athens Radio Symphony Orchestra, the Color Orchestra, the Lyon Orchestra and the Huston Philharmonic.

Tsabropoulos has participated in many international festivals all over Europe and he has performed every season in the musical centers of the world, presenting an ever growing repertoire in recitals, concertos and chamber music. He has made the works of Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin and Bach central references in his performance repertoire but is also committed advocate of Russian music, frequently playing the works of Rachmaninov, Prokoviev and Scriabin. His playing combines intellectual probity with warm and musical feeling, which is marked by sensitivity to tone color and delicacy of finger work.

While Tsabropoulos began his career as a keyboard virtuoso playing concerto and solo pieces, he has since broadened the range of his activities quite considerably. He has reputation as a classical pianist, an interpreter of 19th and 20th century music, and there is an internationally growing recognition for both his composing and his very special improvising piano playing.

Tsabropoulos has composed works for Orchestra, string quartets, music for violin and cello and many solo piano works include the preludes which he wrote especially for Vladimir Ashkenazy. Since 2000 he is an artist of ECM Records label, and since then he has toured in Europe playing with Arild Andersen and John Marshal as a piano trio, and in piano solos with concerts in England, Germany, Italy, Austria, Norway, Denmark, France and Greece. Alongside his tight schedules of concert activities, Tsabropoulos has given master classes of compositions and piano and frequently he is a member of piano competitions.

Vassilis Tsabropoulos is considered as one of the most meticulous musicians of his generation. He lives with his family in Athens.

from www.mymusicbase.ru

By the way, his name is wrongly spelled - it should be Vassilis and not Vasillis
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Aug 2011 at 3:28pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 10:45am
Agusti Fernandez

Over the course of his long and successful career, pianist Agustí Fernández has built up an international reputation, not only as one of Spain’s most outstanding performers, but as a reference in the world of improvised music. Fernández was born in Palma de Mallorca, where he studied piano, later continuing his studies in Barcelona, France and Germany. A professional musician since the age of just thirteen, his life changed completely when he discovered the work of Cecil Taylor and Iannis Xenakis when studying with the latter in 1978. Fernández’s career as a solo artist really began to take off at the II Biennial of Young Creative Artists in Thessaloniki, Greece, in 1987, since when he has performed at major festivals all over Spain and Europe, as well as composing for dance, theatre, cinema and television.

Co-founder and director of the Orquestra del Caos and director of the Big Ensemble del Taller de Músics in Barcelona, Fernández also co-founded the IBA (Improvisadors de Barcelona) Orchestra with Joan Saura and Liba Villavecchia, directing the impro ensemble until 2001.

Agustí Fernández collaborated regularly with fellow pianist Carles Santos, and took part with him in a number of shows from 1982 to 1998. He has also taken part in performances by the artist Jordi Benito, as well as composing music for the Catalan designer Antonio Miró and collaborating with the flamenco cantaor Miguel Poveda, puppeteer Joan Baixas and draftsman Perico Pastor.

Over the course of his career, moreover, he was worked with such outstanding contemporary dance choreographers as Àngels Margarit, María Muñoz, Ramon Oller, Tomás Aragay and Margarita Guergué, amongst others. He also accompanied the Merce Cunningham Dance Company when this renowned dance troupe presented Event in Barcelona in 2009.

In 1998, Fernández began a close artistic collaboration with choreographer and dancer Andrés Corchero, with whom he has created a number of shows over the years. In 1998, moreover, he formed the Trío Local with Joan Saura and Liba Villavecchia.

In 2003, Fernández became the first Spanish musician to record for the prestigious German label ECM, playing with the Evan Parker Electro-Acoustic Ensemble (of which he has been a member since 2002) on the CD Memory/Vision. Fernández also joined the Barry Guy New Orchestra in 2002.

Three years later, in 2005, he formed the Fernández/Guy/López trio. The new ensemble made its debut at the Grec Festival of Barcelona to present the CD Aurora, which won unanimous worldwide critical acclaim.

Fernández was musical director of the TVE programme Glasnost in 1989-91, and co-director (with Barbara Held) of the Metrònom International Experimental Music Week in Barcelona in 1997-1999. From 2000 to 2006, he directed the Nous Sons contemporary music festival, organised at L’Auditori in Barcelona. Finally, he has curated the Music Nights season at the Joan Miró Foundation in the Catalan capital since the year 2000.

Agustí Fernández has also taught impro at ESMUC, the Catalan college of music, since 2000.

A prolific musician, he has recorded more than 50 CDs to date.


from artist's site


I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 10:57am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Aug 2011 at 1:29pm
Julia Hulsman

Jazz singer, songwriter, composer, and pianist Julia Hülsmann was born in Germany, and her intelligent, brilliant, and incisive brand of poetic, artful vocal and piano jazz has brought her tremendous critical respect in her native country but little exposure or attention outside of it. Forming her own trio with bassist Marc Muellbauer and drummer Rainer Winch (Winch was eventually replaced in the trio by Heinrich Köbberling on drums) in 1995, Hülsmann released Trio on BIT Records in 2003 as well as Scattering Poems, featuring vocalist Rebekka Bakken, on the German label ACT that same year. Although she is an accomplished songwriter, Hülsmann's work has often tended toward interpretation, and she has done intriguing reconfigurations of the songs of Randy Newman, Nick Drake, and Sting and has provided striking jazz soundscapes for the poems of E.E. Cummings and Emily Dickinson. Come Closer, with vocalist Anna Lauvergnac, was released in 2004 by ACT, followed by Good Morning Midnight, featuring singer Roger Cicero, in 2006. Hülsmann reverted to a straight trio for two ECM recordings, The End of a Summer, which appeared on in 2008, and Imprint, which followed in 2011.

by Steve Leggett
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Aug 2011 at 3:01pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 9:26am
Jan Garbarek

b. 4 March 1947, Norway. Inspired by hearing John Coltrane on the radio in 1961, Garbarek taught himself to play tenor saxophone (subsequently adding soprano and bass saxophone). In 1962 he won an amateur competition, which resulted in his first professional work, and he was soon leading a group with Jon Christensen, Terje Rypdal and Arild Andersen. In 1968 he was the Norwegian representative at the European Broadcasting Union festival, and the recordings of this (notably an impressive version of Coltrane's 'Naima') brought him to wider notice when they were transmitted throughout Europe.

Subsequently his style has become more severe, sometimes almost bleak, although there is a restrained warmth to his sound. Garbarek's playing is representative of the kind of music associated with Manfred Eicher's ECM Records and of a characteristically Scandinavian strand of jazz, melodic and atmospheric, which has little overt emotionalism but does not lack intensity. His writing and playing display considerable concern with tone and texture and appear to have exerted some influence on Tommy Smith and post-sabbatical Charles Lloyd (with whom he has shared colleagues Christensen, Keith Jarrett and Palle Danielsson) as well as a variety of European players such as Joakim Milder and Alberto Nacci. In the mid-70s he worked in Jarrett's 'Belonging' band with Christensen and Danielsson, recording the much-praised Belonging and My Song, and also played with Ralph Towner on Solstice and Sounds And Shadows. In the 80s his own groups have featured Eberhard Weber, Bill Frisell and John Abercrombie among others. His tours in the late 80s with a band including the remarkable percussionist Nana Vasconcelos were highly acclaimed and inspired many other musicians and bands to essay the juxtaposition of glacially imposing saxophone lines with exotic, tropical rhythm. Garbarek has also worked with Don Cherry, Chick Corea, David Torn and with George Russell during Russell's residency in Scandinavia in the late 60s - an association which resulted in a fine series of recordings that featured the young Garbarek, notably Othello Ballet Suite, Trip To Prillarguri and Electronic Sonata For Souls Loved By Nature (though none was released until the 80s). Garbarek has also shown an increasing interest in folk and ethnic musics that has not only coloured his own playing but led to him recording with Ravi Shankar on the 1984 Song For Everyone and producing an ECM album for the Norwegian folk singer Agnes Buen Gurnas, 1991's Rosensfole. For Ragas & Sagas (1993), Garbarek collaborated with the Pakistani classical singer, Usted Fateh Ali Khan and trio of musicians playing tabla and sarangi, a 39-string violin. Garbarek's melodic solos effectively complemented the traditional Pakistani instrumental sounds. In the same year, Garbarek's Twelve Moons concentrated once again on the Scandinavian-folk melodies he is continually exploring. The album's emphatic rhythmic 'feel' was due in no small part to the presence of drummer Manu Katche and bassist Eberhard Weber. Rather surprisingly, given his avoidance of gallery-pleasing pyrotechnics, Garbarek has steadily acquired a public following equal to his huge critical reputation. Observers of the UK Top 75 album chart in the spring of 1996 would not have been as shocked as would a jazz fan, but horror upon horror, Garbarek's Visible World became a hit. The highly accessible nature of the opening tracks such as 'Red Wind', 'The Creek' and the folk inspired 'The Survivor' aided it's wider appeal. World music followers would also have found a great rapport with the 12-minute mantra 'Evening Land', featuring some wonderful vocals from Mari Boine.

from mymusicbase.ru
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 9:29am
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