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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Jul 2011 at 3:46am
Nik Bartsch

Keyboardist Nik Bärtsch (at times spelled "Baertsch") is a player, composer, and improviser very much in the European classical-oriented style of jazz, but has created a language that transcends these basic categories. A native and resident of Zurich, Switzerland born in 1971, he began his nine-year piano studies at age nine, and also briefly took up clarinet. Listening to blues, jazz, and string quartets, Béla Bartók, Igor Stravinsky, and ethnic musics from Japan, Greece, Romania, and Sweden have all shaped his personalized music. Initially influenced by Chick Corea, Bärtsch attended the Zurich Musikhochschule, then studied philosophy, linguistics, and musicology at the University of Zurich. It was then that he was listening to modern 20th century composers John Cage, Morton Feldman, and Steve Reich, thus fusing the multiplicity of disciplines. In 1980 he first met drummer Kaspar Rast, who is a rhythmic fixture in his ensembles, Mobile and Ronin. He performed and toured with the European guitarist Harald Haerter before performing and recording solo and trio efforts, leading to his initial small ensembles for the Swiss based Tonus label. When Mobile evolved into Ronin by 2001, Bärtsch established his distinct and unique ritual groove music, playing every Monday night at the night club Montags in Zurich, and attracting attention and an audience for his spiritual, minimalist, ethnic, rhythm & blues elevated music that has generally been termed "Zen funk". Occasionally Mobile, featuring Rast and marimba player Mats Eser, regroup to perform. As Bärtsch describes his sound, "to me, music is an art of motion, and thus akin to dancing, an ecstatic groove and an ascetic awareness of form and sound in composed music are not mutually exclusive. They can form combinations that take our senses by surprise." Over the years, Bärtsch has retained that regular early week gig while touring greater Europe, reaching Canada and the U.S. in 2007. ECM records owner Manfred Eicher recognized not only Bärtsch's original approach, but its similarity to the music the label has championed since the early '70s, and signed them, beginning with the revelatory CD Stoa. Ronin expanded to a quintet, with stalwart Rast, percussionist Andi Pupato, bassist Björn Meyer, and saxophonist/bass clarinetist Sha. "The band," says Bärtsch, "has simply reached a much higher level of playing, and as an organism is much further developed."

bio by Michael G. Nastos on www.allmusic.com
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Jul 2011 at 8:43am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 3:22am
Froy Aagre

Saxophonist and composer Frøy Aagre is a rising Norwegian jazz star. Despite her young age she has developed a highly individual expression and her compositions are both imaginative and original. Reviewers have compared Aagre with saxophone legends such as Jan Garbarek, David Liebman and Wayne Shorter. Frøy Aagres recent album Countryside has received world-wide acclaim from critics and musicians alike. The album was rated as one of the top ten albums in 2007 by the Norwegian newspaper Dagsavisen.

Born on June 8, 1977 in Tønsberg, Norway, Frøy Aagre began playing saxophone at the age of twelve and later moved to England to study saxophone at Birmingham Conservatoire. Her fascination of tango music, resulted a semester as an exchange student at Conservatoiro Nacional Lopez Bouchardo in Buenos Aires. After receiving Bachelor of Music with Distinction at Birmingham Conservatoire, she moved to London to pursue a Masters degree at Middlesex University. Back in Norway, she studied Twentieth-Century Composition at Norwegian Academy of Music in Oslo. In 2001, she studied with the world famous saxophonist David Liebman in New York.

Besides being leader for Offbeat, Frøy has performed with such musicians as Pee Wee Ellis, Mike and Mark Mondesir, Kris Davis, Jeff Davis, Annette Aguilar, Eivind Opsvik, Michael Bates, Thomas Strønen and Bjørn Kjellemyr. Aagre has toured in Europe, USA and Africa and played at festivals like Copenhagen Jazzfestival, Aarhus Jazz Festival and Prague Jazz Open.

She has received numerous prizes and scholarships. In 1999 she received the annual jazz prize from the Norwegian Association of Jazz and in 2005 she received the prestigous 1-year Composition Scholarship from the Norwegian Government.

Bio from http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/musician.php?id=2268
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 3:43am
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Verneri Pohjola

Verneri Pohjola has established a reputation as one of Finland's leading -- and busiest -- jazz musicians, but music is in his blood, as he's the son of Pekka Pohjola, one of the country's most adventurous bass players who came of age in the prog rock era of the 1970s. Born in Helsinki, Phojola grew up on movie soundtracks and rock playing "a little bit of everything" before settling mostly on trumpet in a school orchestra. His brother introduced him to jazz which has become his main love. He does still play piano and drums "to fend off boredom." He's active in five bands, Quintessence, the Don Johnson Big Band, Silvio, Q-continuum and his main outlet, the Ilmielikki Quartet, of which he's the leader. The last of these groups came together in 2002 and released their first album, March of the Alpha Males, which received a nomination for an Emma -- the Finnish Grammy -- as Best Jazz Album in 2003. The following year Pohjola was chosen Pori Jazz Festival Young Artist, when he also won Musician of the Year and Best Trumpet Player in a poll of Finnish jazz critics. The band has released a second album, Take It With Me. With Silvio, Pohjola has appeared on Amass All You Can and the EP Silvio, while Quintessence has issued Talk Less, Listen More and AM. Under his own name he's released Agatha , Michelin Star and Aurora.
Bio by  Chris Nickson, All Music Guide

I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote andyman1125 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jul 2011 at 5:48pm
ASA TRIO

ASA TRIO is an organ/guitar/drums trio based in Iceland. The band is Agnar Már Magnúson on organ, Andrés Thor on guitar and Scott McLemore on drums. The band released their first studio albums, aptly titled "Plays the Music of Thelonius Monk" (as the album is a collection of Monk covers) in 2011, while they also have to live albums, "Live at Domo" from 2008 and "A Love Supreme, Live at Cafe Cultura" from 2009. The band has a multitude of influences, ranging from Monk to Jimi Hendrix.

Official website: http://www.asa-trio.com/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 12:40am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 2:18am
Ambrose Akinmusire

Trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire is a forward-thinking musician with a bent toward atmospheric post-bop. Born in Oakland, California, Akinmusire showed early promise by his teens and gigged professionally while also playing in the Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble. Early encounters with such luminaries as saxophonists Joe Henderson and Steve Coleman pushed Akinmusire to focus a keen eye on his own development. He earned his bachelor's degree from the Manhattan School of Music and later his master's from the University of Southern California. Along the way, Akinmusire studied with such trumpet luminaries as master teacher Laurie Frink, Lew Soloff, and Terence Blanchard. Akinmusire has appeared as a sideman on many albums, including works by saxophonist Coleman, pianists Aaron Parks and Vijay Iyer, trombonist Josh Roseman, bassist Esperanza Spalding, and others. In 2007 Akinmusire won the Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition and the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition. A year later he released his debut solo album, Prelude to Cora, on Fresh Sound New Talent. In 2011 Akinmusire returned with his sophomore album, When the Heart Emerges Glistening, on Blue Note Records.
Bio by  Matt Collar., Rovi, from www.starpulse.com
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 2:25am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 3:07am
Richie Beirach

Richard Beirach, 23 May 1947, New York City, New York, USA. As a child, Beirach studied both classical and jazz piano before attending the Berklee College Of Music and the Manhattan School of Music. He graduated from the latter in 1972, promptly joining Stan Getz. Shortly after this, he began a long-term and hugely productive association with Dave Liebman. In order to fulfil the broad-based musical demands of Liebman’s group, Lookout Farm, Beirach also began playing keyboards. Nevertheless, his preferred instrument remained the piano. Although this particular group of Liebman’s was soon disbanded, Beirach later became a member of the saxophonist’s group, Quest. In the meantime, he had formed his own group, Eon, and had worked with John Abercrombie’s quartet. Beirach has played and sometimes recorded as sideman with many other leaders, including Chet Baker, Freddie Hubbard, Lee Konitz and John Scofield. Musicians with whom he has collaborated as leader or co-leader include Abercrombie, George Coleman, Dave Holland, Jack DeJohnette and Liebman.

Throughout the 90s, Beirach had a highly productive working relationship with the French-born saxophonist Henrik Frisk. In his composing and playing, Beirach’s twin musical influences make their presence heard. The classical side is brought out in his compositions through intriguingly mixed echoes of late nineteenth-century romanticism and twentieth-century angularity. Beirach’s playing reflects an array of pianistic influences, notably the dazzling yet diverse styles of Art Tatum, Bud Powell and Bill Evans. Nevertheless, he achieves an exceptionally individualistic sound, partly through a near-classical pastoral impressionism, marking him out as a piano player of consequence.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Popular Music by Colin Larkin



I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2011 at 3:47am
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Hijaz

Hijaz is a sextet that combines elements of world music with jazz. Hijaz is the name of an Arab musical motif, but the band’s name also holds a clear reference to jazz.The music of the group is based on the dialogue between Tunesian oud player Moufadhel Adhoum and pianist Niko Deman and started with the release of the record Rag Rag by Tunesian singer Zohra Lajnef on which Hijaz also performed. The record was released in 2004 in Tunesia only but laid the basis for further collaboration.

The group consist of aforementioned musicians plus Moroccan percussionist Azzedine Jazzouli, bass player Rui Salgado and drummer/percussionist Chryster Aerts, both jazz musicians from Belgium. This rhythm sections uses traditions from Morocco to India as influence for its adventurous and solid basis. Above this, oud and piano interact and create a mysterious athmosphere. Elements from the Maghreb, Middle East and western jazz are very strong in the music and create a European-Mediterranean sound. The band may have met in Belgium but their music instantly transports you to the calm inner courtyard of some shady house a stone's throw from the bustle of the market in some North-African town.

In May 2008 Hijaz released the debut Cd Dunes which was very well received in the press (see press section). On it you can also hear renowned Armenian duduk player Vardan Hovanissian who has recently become the sixth member of Hijaz.


Bio taken from http://www.zephyrusvzw.be/database/index.php?q=artists/hijaz/biography


I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jul 2011 at 7:51am
Melody Gardot

The story of vocalist Melody Gardot is as remarkable as any who perseveres against abject adversity. Born in New Jersey in 1985, she took up piano and played as a youngster on the nightclub scene of Philadelphia, influenced by jazz, folk, rock and pop musics. At age 19 she was a fashion student at the Community College of Philadelphia. But, on a fateful day, while riding her bicycle, the driver of a Jeep made an illegal turn, hurdling into Gardot and leaving her in the street for dead. Hospitalized for months with multiple head injuries and pelvic fractures, her love for music was the best therapy she could receive. While in her hospital bed, she wrote and recorded songs that would become the EP Some Lessons. Upon her eventual release from intensive care, Gardot found the strength and determination to further her career as an artist. Blessed with a beautiful voice and grand insight as a songwriter, her cognitive powers slowly but surely became pronounced, leading to the independent recording and release of her debut CD, Worrisome Heart, which was reissued in 2007 by Verve records. Her music could be described as a cross between Laura Nyro, Joni Mitchell, Eva Cassidy, and Shania Twain, but goes deeper than mere pop convention. Gardot is hypersensitive to light and noise, thus she wears dark glasses, and uses a cane to walk. On-stage she requires a special seating unit, and wears a Transcutaneous Electro-Nerve Stimulator, a TENS device, to assist in alleviating her neuralgic muscle pain. As amazing as her story is, what is more evident is that she possesses a blue style and persona that reflects not only her afflictions, but conversely the hope and joy of making personalized music that marks her as an individual and original. Though touring is difficult, she has been performing in major cities on the East Coast to support her recordings. In 2009, working with producer Larry Klein and arranger Vince Mendoza -- both known for their work with Joni Mitchell -- Gardot followed up her Verve debut with My One and Only Thrill

Bio by Michael G. Nastos taken from www.starpulse.com
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jul 2011 at 7:58am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jul 2011 at 4:43am
Misha Alperin

Mikhail Alperin was born in the Ukraine in 1956 and grew up in a rural area of Bessarabia, the eastern part of Moldavia. Until 1976 he studied classical piano at music schools and academies in the Ukraine and Moldavia. Since 1977 he has worked as a free-lance arranger, composer and practicing musician. In 1980, along with Simon Shirman, Alperin founded the first Moldavian jazz quartet by developing his idea of linking jazz and folk.

Like most of the world's musicians, Alperin was obliged to earn his living with dance and party music. For the young musician, however, this music embodied things old and past. The future and freedom were to be found in music influenced by the West, music like rock and jazz. It was not until he had played in Moscow jazz circles for several years that he discovered the musical sounds of his native country for his own work. In Moscow he found other musicians also interested in integrating the musical traditions of their countries into jazz as an element of equal value, and in drawing from the rich tradition of the music of the peoples of the immense Soviet Union. It was during this period that he made the acquaintance of the brilliant hornist Arkady Shilkloper, a member of the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra who nevertheless also belonged to the circle of jazz musicians.

In the CD production Prayer Alperin & Shilkloper have expanded their jazz explorations eastward. They not only integrate a genuine singer of traditional Russian music, Sergei Starostin, in their duo, but also risk a spectacular encounter of two very different cultures: that of Mongolia / Southern Siberia, with origins in Buddhism, represented by vocalists from Kyzyl, the capital of small Siberian autonomy Tuva, and the Russian choir tradition. The result is amazing. Our Eurocentric perception is immediately transported into other remote times and spaces. Thanks to Alperin's sense of composition, one cannot help but feel that here jazz meets the Middle Ages.

Alperin's contribution to contemporary music is not only the unbiased integration of the most various peoples' musical traditions and the crossing of stylistic boundaries: Free of care, he also fuses music of the past with contemporary elements.

In 1989, in a duo with Arkady Shilkloper, Alperin recorded the much-admired CD "Waves of Sorrow" for ECM; then his new production "North Story", recorded with Tore Brumborg, Jon Christensen, Terje Gevelt and Arkady Shilkloper, appeared there in the spring of 1996. With these musicians Alperin has also recorded works of Paul Hindemith and other composers of Classical Modernism.

In 1993 Alperin moved to Oslo in order to take on a position as professor of piano at the music academy there.

In the late autumn of 1995, Mikhail Alperin had the musical direction of an unusual project uniting two previously unacquainted musical cultures in Sofia, Bulgaria: the women's choir Angelite with its quite uncommon singing techniques and the four-man ensemble Huun Huur Tu from the Southern Siberian region of Tuva, bordering on Mongolia. The latter group, for its part, cultivates a form of overtone and undertone singing which is also quite foreign for the Western ear. A third independent vocal style is added to the production by the Russian singer Sergei Starostin. Alperin, who has composed works for children's choirs, chamber orchestras, and jazz ballet as well as a concert for flugelhorn, piano and symphony orchestra, wrote the arrangements for all of the pieces in this production.


from www.mymusicbase.ru
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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Tin Hat Trio

Transplanted from New York to the Bay Area, the chamber jazz group Tin Hat Trio consists of accordionist Rob Burger, guitarist Mark Orton, and violinist Carla Kihlstedt. The group's unique blend of structure, improvisation, and contemporary classical, folk, world, and jazz elements reflects each member's other performing experiences. Kihlstedt majored in classical violin performance at the Oberlin Conservatory and went on to become a prominent performer in both classical and improvised music, playing with artists like John Zorn and Roscoe Mitchell, and recording with Eugene Chadbourne, the Grassy Knoll, and Tom Waits. She also appeared on Philip Glass' series Music at the Anthology, sings and plays with another Bay Area band (Charming Hostess), collaborates with choreographer Jo Kreiter, and is a graphic designer/illustrator as well.

Orton started playing guitar as a child and eventually studied composition at the Peabody Conservatory and the Hart School of Music. Also a professional recording and sound engineer, Orton worked on sessions with Bill Frisell, John Zorn, and the Lounge Lizards, and engineered the sound at the Knitting Factory for two years. Orton plays banjo, lute, dobro, lap steel, and electric guitar with his other group, San Francisco's Old Joe Clarks, and has composed scores for independent films like Beverly Wachtel's Just Noticeable Difference.

Burger studied classical piano at Juilliard and explored different improvisational styles at the University of Massachusetts with Max Roach, Archie Stepp, and Yusef Lateef. He broadened his range to include Hammond organ and vintage keyboards like the Optigan and Chamberlin, toy pianos and keyboards, and the accordion. Burger has toured with Bill Frisell, Don Byron, and Joey Baron, and appeared on Frisell's Tales from the Far Side soundtrack. Since moving to the Bay Area, Burger has worked with artists as diverse as Tipsy and Mix Master Mike; he is also a member of the Oranj Symphonette, as well as his bandmate Orton's other project, Old Joe Clarks. As the Tin Hat Trio, they released their debut album, Memory Is an Elephant, on Angel Records in early 1999; Helium followed in spring 2000, boasting appearances from Tom Waits and an uncredited Mike Patton. Two years later, the ambitious The Rodeo Eroded showcased their own unique music as well as guest appearances from Phish drummer Jon Fishman and Willie Nelson. 2004's Book of Silk went in a more abstract direction; that year, Burger left the band, while frequent collaborators Ara Anderson and clarinetist Ben Goldberg joined the fold. Reflecting their new status, the group rechristened themselves Tin Hat for 2007's The Sad Machinery of Spring.

from www.allmusic.com
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jul 2011 at 4:54am
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Manu Katche


Emmanuel 'Manu' Katche was born in St Maur des Fossés, near Paris, in 1958, though his family roots go back to Africa's Ivory Coast. He studied piano from the age of 5, switching to drums at 14 and studying classical percussion at the Conservatoire National Supérieure de Musique de Paris. He has often said that his drum style is essentially an amalgam of African rhythm concepts and classical drumming, illuminated by the in-the-moment interaction of jazz. “When I play jazz I get called a 'rock drummer'. When I do rock projects, critics write about 'the jazz drummer Manu Katché'. But I'm just being myself, trying to be innovative as the music is played, and I guess that is more of a 'jazz' attitude.”

Music on ECM had been one of Katché's teenage inspirations: “I heard my first ECM album when I was about fifteen, and I remember I was amazed by the sound and by the way the music was played: big and bold but with a lot of respect for silence and a real musical balance between the instruments....” He was to arrive at the label by an indirect route, however. By the mid-1980s his floating beat had become one of the signature sounds of pop and rock, sup-porting singers from Joni Mitchell to Peter Gabriel. Manfred Eicher heard Katché playing on Robbie Robertson's untitled Geffen album and felt that his pulses and patterns, simultaneously modern and tribal, could easily be adapted to improvised contexts.

Invited to participate in ECM's 20th anniversary concerts in Paris in 1989, Katché played first in a trio with Jan Garbarek and Indian violinist Shankar in a concert at La Cigale. The encounter was to lead to Katché's membership of the Garbarek Group and his presence on a series of albums: I Took Up The Runes, Ragas and Sagas, Twelve Moons, Visible World, In Praise Of Dreams. Manu recently rejoined Jan's band for several months of live work with concerts which continue until the

end of 2007 in Germany, Belgium, Ireland, the Netherlands, Turkey, Portugal and Switzerland.

from www.allaboutjazz.com
I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote idlero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 5:58am
Roberto Fonseca

Roberto Alain Fonseca Cortés, 29 March 1975, Havana, Cuba. Taking to music from an early age, Fonseca first emulated his percussionist father by playing drums before turning to the piano. The household was very musical, his mother being a professional singer and two brothers, drummer Emilio Valdés and pianist Jesus ‘Chuchito’ Valdés Jnr., became professional musicians. Fonseca studied at the Guillermo Tomás School of Music in Havana and in 1991, when in his mid-teens, he performed at the Havana Jazz Plaza International Festival and attracted considerable attention. After graduation, through the mid-90s he performed at other festivals and in concert and at clubs playing solo and in various groups that included Agua Pura and Temperamento, co-leading the latter with saxophonist Javier Zalba.

In addition to playing extensively in Cuba, Fonseca has also performed in Colombia, Canada and Australia, and has visited Europe, receiving acclaim in England, France (playing live in Paris for the July 2006 Agnès B fashion show), Germany, Spain and Italy, touring the latter country with singer Augusto Enriquez, with whom he also recorded, Cuando Yo Sea Grande. Among artists with whom he has shared stages and sometimes recorded are George Benson, Michael Brecker, the Buena Vista Social Club, José Luis ‘Chico’ Cortés, Angá Díaz, Ibrahim Ferrer (with whom he appeared internationally as musical director of the singer’s 2005 Mi Sueño: A Bolero Songbook tour), Herbie Hancock, Roy Hargrove, Frank Emilio, Rubén González, Giovanni Hidalgo, Papo Luca, Omara Portuondo (with whom he played at 2002’s Tokyo Jazz Festival), Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Wayne Shorter, Timbalada, Bebo Valdés and Chucho Valdés. In addition to his performing schedule, Fonseca has taught at the Cuban National School of Art. Fonseca has also composed music for films and has produced albums for other artists, including Asa Feeston and Obsesión.


I think the problem with a lot of the fusion music is that it's extremely predictable, it's a rock rhythm and the solos all play the same stuff and they play it over and over again ...
Ken Burns
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