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anyone remembers Brass Rock???

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Sean Trane View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sean Trane Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: anyone remembers Brass Rock???
    Posted: 26 Apr 2011 at 3:34am
Indeed that was the first name genre for bands like Chicago, The Flock, Electric Flag (don't remember seeing EF on the database, thoughConfused), BS&T, If and a few more
 
 
Among the UK bands (already mentionned If), Brainchild, Warm Dust, Gailliard and the first two Skin alley albums can be considered as brass rock as well.
 
--------------
 
as an aside:
Should the name brass rock be mentionned in the genres???
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kazuhiro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Apr 2011 at 3:46am

The part of the wind instrument is exactly as a characteristic of Brass Rock, and the element might be and there be a strong impression.

Chicago, BS&T, and Chase are in Pop Jazz now. And, TOP is in Funk. Entering there if the subgenre of JMA has been established as a result might be appropriate.

When it thinks from the element as the overall music.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Atavachron Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Apr 2011 at 10:01pm
love BS&T
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dick Heath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Nov 2011 at 7:59am
Over summer somebody suggested I checked out the remastered Rock Workshop CDs (released by Angel Air, noting the original vinyl recordings were issued in the early 70's). Ray Russell's band (fairly well known as a jazz fusion nowaday both as soloist and gueesting with others, e.g. SImon Phillips Force Majeure) with the great late Alex Harvey (subsequently of SAHB?) providing voice. Personally I would put this band  ahead the UK compettive brass rock of time, i.e. Satisfaction (reissued on Eclectic Records) and the patchy Heaven's Brass Rock 1. However, If is head and shoulders above these three IMHO. BTW anybody identify a specific Keef Hartley recording that show genuine brass rock creditials?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sean Trane Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Nov 2011 at 8:15am
Originally posted by Dick Heath Dick Heath wrote:

Over summer somebody suggested I checked out the remastered Rock Workshop CDs (released by Angel Air, noting the original vinyl recordings were issued in the early 70's). Ray Russell's band (fairly well known as a jazz fusion nowaday both as soloist and gueesting with others, e.g. SImon Phillips Force Majeure) with the great late Alex Harvey (subsequently of SAHB?) providing voice. Personally I would put this band  ahead the UK compettive brass rock of time, i.e. Satisfaction (reissued on Eclectic Records) and the patchy Heaven's Brass Rock 1. However, If is head and shoulders above these three IMHO.
BTW anybody identify a specific Keef Hartley recording that show genuine brass rock creditials?
 
It was i who suggested RW's reissues
 
When it comes to British brass-rock, I tend to prefer Warm Dust... (they're on PA)
 
 
I investigated in the early 90's the KHB, but I could't possibly tell you anymore which album is best
 
They're all pretty brass-y, but mlore in the blues domain than in the jkazz domain, IMHO.
my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicted musicians to crazy ones....

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Dick Heath View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dick Heath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Nov 2011 at 11:16am
I picked up, I think ,the second Warm Dust album recently , but it didn't appeal. 
 
Last week on the radio show I played something off Savoy Brown's Burnt Sienna, i.e. Needle and Spoon which is blue based brass rock. So possibly taking the lead from Mayall, e.g. on Bare Wires  I think a number of British blues bands of the period  tried augmenting with brass/woodwind  so perhaps not surprising ex Mayalll drummer, Keef Hartley going that way. 
 
I must dig out the track listing of two brass rock CD compilations I made several years ago, after requesting on the web, bands I couldn't name at the time - as a reminder, Tower Of Power was most strongly recommended by a number of folks, followed by Cold Blood.  I bow to the experts wrt ToP, but feel this type of music categorisation, branches out and impinges on brass funk. Then  perhaps because of the Chicago blues and R'nB/soul fusion of Electric Flag (not surprising with Buddy Miles and Nick Gravenites providing the vocals), then Flag is more brass funk than brass rock? SImilarly the more recent brass lead music of Defunkt, is brass  funk IMHO. However, brass funk as a an added descriptor  to  the  jazz funk of Danish band Monsieur DuBois (even with Defunkt's Lester Bowie guesting on trombone/vocals) may be stretching it....(size of the band???)?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sean Trane Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Nov 2011 at 12:00pm
Originally posted by Dick Heath Dick Heath wrote:

I picked up, I think ,the second Warm Dust album recently , but it didn't appeal. 
 
Last week on the radio show I played something off Savoy Brown's Burnt Sienna, i.e. Needle and Spoon which is blue based brass rock. So possibly taking the lead from Mayall, e.g. on Bare Wires  I think a number of British blues bands of the period  tried augmenting with brass/woodwind  so perhaps not surprising ex Mayalll drummer, Keef Hartley going that way. 
 
 
That's Raw Sienna (and easily Savoy Brown's best album imho).... Probably my preferred second wave British Blues Boom band along with TYA and Chicken Shack
 
As for WD's Peace for Our Time, it's probably the more difficult, because it's a concept album with small monologues
 
 
my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicted musicians to crazy ones....

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote seyo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Nov 2011 at 8:18am
In Yugoslavia at that period, late 60s, there existed two bands influenced by BST and Chicago.
MLADI LEVI (The Young Lions) from Ljubljana and MI (We) from Sibenik/Zagreb. They were both popular and very good live acts but unfortunately none of them ever recorded an album, just few singles and EPs. Both bands however released some CD compilations after the 90s.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkprinceofjazz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Dec 2011 at 5:44pm
I have a few vinyl copies of Lighthouse and IF, I think they would surely qualify as Brass Rock, IF is the better of the two in my opinion, In fact, IF's first 4 album measure up quite well with Chicago's first 3 or 4.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sean Trane Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2012 at 2:28pm
Originally posted by darkprinceofjazz darkprinceofjazz wrote:

I have a few vinyl copies of Lighthouse and IF, I think they would surely qualify as Brass Rock, IF is the better of the two in my opinion, In fact, IF's first 4 album measure up quite well with Chicago's first 3 or 4.
indeed, both qualify easy as brass rockClap
my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicted musicians to crazy ones....

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jan 2012 at 3:43pm
Blood Sweat And Tears for me. Not mad on Chicago but then again I have only heard mainly the radio singles and they are okiay but I never bought any. I do have one Chicago album and if anyone knows Chicago they will probaly roll their eyes and have a cackle.
 
 
Yeah it number 10............."If you leave me now, you'll take away the biggest part of me" I think he was talking about his money LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dick Heath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Mar 2012 at 8:32am
Found a live recording of Electric Flag, Groovin' Is Easy - I guess it is a bootleg recording made circa 1968, now legitimised. For instance Buddy Miles sings (and of course drums) on Killing Floor (note: Nick Gravenites did the vocals on the studio recording), making the tune less blues and more soul. More importantly there are more instrumental breaks/solos, and from brass/wind instrumentals I get a clearer understanding why Electric Flag was called one of the first brass rock bands - but Bloomfield still does some good Chicago style blues guitar work.
 
I forget if I've mentioned it here, but a better bootleg legitmised is Chicago's 1968 album, I believe recorded when they were the resident/house band  in one of the LA music clubs (Troubadour?) , and essentially honing tunes that were to recorded some months later and heard on CTA and Chicago.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sean Trane Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Mar 2012 at 10:14am
Originally posted by Dick Heath Dick Heath wrote:

Found a live recording of Electric Flag, Groovin' Is Easy - I guess it is a bootleg recording made circa 1968, now legitimised. For instance Buddy Miles sings (and of course drums) on Killing Floor (note: Nick Gravenites did the vocals on the studio recording), making the tune less blues and more soul. More importantly there are more instrumental breaks/solos, and from brass/wind instrumentals I get a clearer understanding why Electric Flag was called one of the first brass rock bands - but Bloomfield still does some good Chicago style blues guitar work.
 
 
yup, they (EL) were truly the pioneers, and they'd become kind of irrelevant by the time BS&T and Chicago appeared on the scene
 
Apparently another pioneering band would be the San Fran based (in the flower power  and summer of love)era) Sons of Champlin... they had a three-man horn section (two sax and a trumpet >> one of them also played vibraphone)... OK, unlike Electric flag, they kept on for most of the 70's.
my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicted musicians to crazy ones....

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dick Heath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Mar 2012 at 7:25am
Originally posted by Sean Trane Sean Trane wrote:

 
yup, they (EL) were truly the pioneers, and they'd become kind of irrelevant by the time BS&T and Chicago appeared on the scene
 
Apparently another pioneering band would be the San Fran based (in the flower power  and summer of love)era) Sons of Champlin... they had a three-man horn section (two sax and a trumpet >> one of them also played vibraphone)... OK, unlike Electric flag, they kept on for most of the 70's.
 
Once they decided to fuse Chicago blues with Atlantic-Stax soul, I think there was an easy "small step evolution" to also take the sound/feel of Atlantic-Stax's Bar-Keys or Mussel Shoal's brass. It is clear their writing and playing, Bloomfield and Gravenites (out of Paul Butterfield's Blues Band) were both in blues and soul ( and of course rock), and I think across the four EF albums in my collection, the balance seems in favour of soul music.
 
As vague (?)  modern-day parallel, it is worth watching the DVD of Chicago and Earth Fire Wind's  Live At The Greek, when for example 25 or 6 to 4 gets some soul treatment.
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