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darkshade View Drop Down
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    Posted: 09 Apr 2011 at 1:04pm
A discussion broke out at this thread http://www.jazzmusicarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=189 about the correct labeling of jazz music considered "Post-Fusion/Contemporary". Can we please get to the bottom of this?

It seems there is confusion about the meaning of the genre tag. I personally thought it meant jazz music (usually post-bop or some other contemporary jazz genre) mixed with jazz-rock/funk/fusion tendencies, maybe even a little world fusion. Apparently this is not always the case, and I am a little confused.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snobb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Apr 2011 at 1:28pm
"Post-fusion" part of this tag generally means chronological aspect. "Contemporary jazz" is quite popular genre tag , partially in Europe, but I see it's wide in use in music media around the world. 

Post-bop and fusion (chronologically) more current version with elements of smooth jazz = post-fusion/contemporary jazz.  Personally me, I usually hear it from very first composition's sound by what I name "polished sound" (or more compressed sound). Possibly when you listen more of it, you can easily feel the difference (speaking about clear cases - for sure there always are borderline ones)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Apr 2011 at 1:41pm
Don't mean to sound condescending, but here's the definition:

As jazz continues to grow and evolve, the borders that divide some of the different genres have become less clear. Since the demise of the original fusion movement, many jazz musicians have turned to a more relaxed and polished sound that still maintains strong elements of virtuoso technique and artistic creativity. These artists may blend several elements including; smooth jazz, post-bop, modern RnB, fusion, Latin rhythms, new age, pop and third stream. Meanwhile, in a similar development, many young jazz musicians raised on electric fusion have turned to a semi-acoustic post-bop style that still contains the energy and some stylistic elements of fusion. At JMA, all of the above described artists can be found in our Post-Fusion Contemporary genre.

Post-Fusion Contemporary is the style of jazz heard most often in today's clubs, and on popular jazz radio stations as well.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkshade Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Apr 2011 at 2:07pm
Originally posted by js js wrote:


Post-Fusion Contemporary is the style of jazz heard most often in today's clubs, and on popular jazz radio stations as well.


to be honest, that is kind of what I thought of when I read the definition, but not necessarily "smooth jazz"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkshade Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Apr 2011 at 2:16pm
to quote js from the other thread....

Originally posted by js js wrote:

The two videos you played are Classic Fusion, I don't know about the albums you bring up and I didn't label them either.

A lot of Contemp artists are going to be more smooth in the studio, but more energetic live.


so say something like The Dave Weckl Band? I have their album "Multiplicity", which is "smoother" in the sense the mix is more compressed but it's not something I would call Classic Fusion, which is what he is listed as here.

Then I have a live album as well "Live (And Very Plugged In)" which is the same band, but the playing is more in line with classic fusion (heavier bass, more abrasive key and guitar, and of course insane drums)

I noticed Weckl's page is missing a lot of albums, will do that later
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Apr 2011 at 2:37pm
Weckl is a good example of an artist who does both, and falls right in between the two often.
As you know, when an artists is first imported, he is given a sort of default tag, in this case for Weckl it was Classic Fusion, but as collabs like yourself go through his dicog, you sort out which albums are Fusion and which ones are Contemp.

Yeah, its real common for sort of smooth fusion artists to rock out more live. I love the Miles 'Amandla' album, which is labeled Contemp, but I saw that album performed live and it was way more intense live.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkshade Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Apr 2011 at 2:53pm
yea true. Ok i think I understand a little better

About Miles in the 80s, I almost always go for his live stuff at that time. We Want Miles beats The Man With the Horn, though not by much. I also have a Warsaw 1984 recording (from a radio broadcast) featuring John Scofield, and it is quite abrasive, with Sco shredding like a metal guitarist over funky rhythms. I think it's Al Foster on drums, and man, contemporary is the last thing you think of when you hear him play. I wish Miles had that power in the studio, but then again, it was the 80s.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Apr 2011 at 4:38pm
Feel free to go through the Weckl discog and fix any of the genre tags, unless someone else has already gone through and fixed them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkshade Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Apr 2011 at 11:38pm
Originally posted by js js wrote:

Feel free to go through the Weckl discog and fix any of the genre tags, unless someone else has already gone through and fixed them.


I'll do what I can, I haven't heard all of his albums
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