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Cuban Music and its Deriavitives

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Matt View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jul 2012 at 5:31pm
Originally posted by js js wrote:

Yeah, that is the most African sounding, complex poly-rhythms.
I got your PM John the new one was just a repeat of the missing one. I am finding as the morning weers on these days this computer just keeps getting slower. ( family computer.. File sharing programs) Unhappy I reckon. It is like I have that Torrent going. Not me I would never download a movie ShockedWink It is those children of mine. Yeah I get them to do it for me Smile Anyway will get the Son In Law over soon to have a look . I reckon though he will say either wipe the lot or just get a new oneConfused Funny thing though it could be internet as my wifes lap top which has no crap at all, as she only uses it, is getting the same problem. Could be that router or could even be the provider with band width. Will need to check out. But still in action now.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jul 2012 at 5:40pm
Just chain your computer to the back bumper of the family vehicle and take it around the block for a "re-boot", works everytime. Thumbs Up
You son-in-law will never question your authority again,  ...he will keep a respectful distance as well.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jul 2012 at 9:03pm
What followed after The Mambo was another form of new music that became known as 'The Cha Cha Cha" and the first and leading expononent of this new music was Orquesta America. This band had what is known today as a Charanga set up which is usually no horns within the band that a Conjunto has but they are replaced with flute and violin which is more of that old French influence coming in too the bands set up. The Cha Cha Cha is basically a Danzon from which it was originally created but it also a Danzon with singing added as by this time in 1953 they were all played instrumental. Ninon Mondejar is claimed to be the creator of this style and the first to play it with his Orquesta throughout Cuba. The Orquesta had created this new form of Danzon with each youth club that they performed with each having their own one, with the most famous I suppose due to it's name being the Silver Star club. The band had a all but distingrated in Mexico but before they even left Cuba, Nino Mondejar had a falling out with his lead violinist and arranger Enrique Jorrin over who was the creator of this new music and sacked him. When the band arrived in Mexico over half returned to Cuba dissatisfied and meet up again with Enrique Jorrin and created Orquesta America Del 55 in 1955
 
Here is the original Orquesta doing their first "Rico Vacilon" 1953
 
 
And this is a later one from Orquesta America del 55 without Nino
 
 
I will say that today "Cha Cha Cha" is usually labelled as just Charanga.


Edited by Matt - 12 Jul 2012 at 9:27pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jul 2012 at 9:35pm
That's the connection I was looking for the other day. Basically that steady rhythm they use in cah-cha, even accents on all four beats, is the beat they mix with RnB to get a lot of the boogaloo beats. This is where that cowbell on every downbeat comes from.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 5:49pm
Originally posted by js js wrote:

That's the connection I was looking for the other day. Basically that steady rhythm they use in cah-cha, even accents on all four beats, is the beat they mix with RnB to get a lot of the boogaloo beats. This is where that cowbell on every downbeat comes from.
I love cha cha cha. Love that Charanga sound John. We need more good Charanga releases these days. That Reggaeton has taken overUnhappy Salsa has been in the doldrums and there are nowhere near the amount of releases that were coming out 10 years ago. But I think that is the same with almost everything. Companies don't want to take a chance much anymore. I suppose you can't blame them with music sales on the down but they will never go up either if they don't take chances.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 5:54pm
What about the original Oye Como Va (Tito correct?) what would you call that style?
Once again it has that steady accent on all four beats.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 6:13pm
Originally posted by js js wrote:

What about the original Oye Como Va (Tito correct?) what would you call that style?
Once again it has that steady accent on all four beats.
It is a cha cha cha John slightly changed by Tito Puente and given that ooomph. Not so much with Tito but after the sixties it is hard to pick some due to all the contempary input and other elements with even Puerto Rican styles mixed in , Plena's. Bomba's etc
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 6:20pm
Yes!! got one LOL             I've always thought was a sort of modern cha cha hybrid.

Edited by js - 13 Jul 2012 at 6:20pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 6:21pm
A lot of that boogalloo comes from the cha cha too, correct?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kazuhiro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 7:18pm
Because John mentioned Boogaloo, I remembered "Ivan Boogaloo Joe Jones". Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kazuhiro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 7:48pm
I understood that Boogaloo was a genre such as the mixture which increased various factors in Latin music. Of course it might have the relationship that was close to salsa. "Ocho" is in the site. They still performed pure salsa at that point, but the existence of the boogaloo might slightly give a change in rhythm of the Latin music in the 70s.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 8:18pm
Yeah, Boogaloo is like a mixture of Afro-Cuban jazz and American RnB. Its wonderful music, great for a hot summer night.

   ... ahem  ... when Matt's not here, I am the Latin music expert Cool
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kazuhiro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 8:31pm
And I must learn his overwhelming information desperately when Matt returned here. However, I am still a student of John now. Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 8:40pm
I'm afraid you won't learn much from me Ermm         ...but Matt will be back soon enough, loaded up with enough montunos to last us till Christmas. Big smile       ... or loaded up with something.

Edited by js - 13 Jul 2012 at 8:42pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kazuhiro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 8:51pm
Big smile

I referred to solo of Steve Gadd about Montuno rhythm before, but his personality seemed to be too outstanding.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 8:56pm
The montuno is the repeating piano part, and Gadd is showing some rhythms he can play against that, good stuff.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kazuhiro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 9:10pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kazuhiro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2012 at 9:10pm
Thank you. I am going to be familiar with even Montuno.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 6:30pm
Trova is another style of Cuban music and one where the folk traditions hold sway as Trova is primarily accoustic and usually played with just tres or guitar and one artist is all you need. Trobadour is a perfect description but Trova can be played with additions to the line-up and it is the rural music or you could even say the country a'la Cubana. Trova was originally written by the greats who many were musically illiterate and could not read or write music but as with folk music a great tune still keeps getting handed down but still a lot of the early Trova pre 1900 is lost. They all started to come about in the mid 1800's and some of the most famous were  Pepe Sanchez, Sindo Garay but there is another that was mentioned in our Son post being Manuel Carona who assisted Maria Teresa Vera.
 
One of the modern greats is Compay Segundo who regained attention thanks to The Buena Vista Social Club but originally his name was Francisco Repilado and with Lorenzo Hierrezuelo formed Duo Los Comprades. These two were busy already as Lorenzo was playing with Maria Teresa Vera and in Miguel Matamoro's conjunto. Fransisco was also with Miguel's conjunto but he was on clarinet not tres back in 1948. The story goes Maria Teresa Vera became ill and Lorenzo arranged for Fransisco to replace her on tres and Duo Los Comprades was created. They also used accompaniment musicians, guiro, bongos and bass within they're recordings and shows which many of the songs were written jointly and alone by these two musicians. Son is the major component to Trova.
 
Here they are doing some absolute classic old Son
 
 
This man was the Guajira specialist, oh but he sang them as we say in a western fashion "stripped". Solo, trio or conjunto this man played them all and his popularity was immense throughout the late 1930's until the mid forties being Guillermo Portables. He actually is my favourite as he sang them in trained slightly formal manner but he could hold a songs melody with his voice to perfection. Oh, you are transplanted right under the coconut tree with how this man played his Trova. Not the original take unfortunately but never the less still absolutely beautiful with this Guajira. He whistles as well in the original.
 
 
 
One of the modern ones is Eliades Ochoa who is another with that Buena Vista Social Club and here is little swinger that will have you wishing that red swirling dress with the legs to go with it, is in your lounge entertaining you. Modern style Trova
 


Edited by Matt - 16 Jul 2012 at 6:31pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote js Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2012 at 3:14pm
Spanish is probably the finest language for vocals. After my appreciation for American RnB singers, I'd say my favorite singers are in Spanish or French, but with an African dialect or influence, especially African pop/funk music.

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